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Emily Carr's Adventure to Art

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Introduction

Emily Carr's Adventure to Art Bonnie Cheng Mrs. Talbot Grade 9 Art November 12, 2001 Emily Carr's Adventure to Art Emily Carr, one of Canada's favorite and best-known artists had accomplished a lot in her lifetime. She was born on December 13th, 1871 on Vancouver Island in a small town of Victoria. However she had sadly passed away on March 2nd 1945 because of poor health conditions. Her dreams were always to become an artist and create her own Canadian style. Yet, she had overcome lots of problems in which she faced them with courage, imagination and humor. Her inspirations of becoming an artist all started out when she was a child. She was nicknamed "Small" in her family since she was the smallest child out of five children who were all girls. Emily was different from all her sisters. They liked to play Ladies but she didn't. She even thought animals were better companions than her sisters. She longed for a dog when she was 8 years old but she wasn't allowed. So she decided to draw one and figured out drawing was fun. When she showed her father, he was impressed. He decided to arrange her into drawing lessons. She discovered drawing was so much fun that she couldn't stop at all. However she was always getting into trouble such as not listening in class. ...read more.

Middle

(Indians) When she arrived back to Vancouver, she still had a great desire to paint the forest. However, she needs to earn money to buy food and pay for her expenses. She was hired to teach art in Ladies' Art Club of Vancouver but the ladies had no interest in learning how to draw. They only had interest in chattering and didn't want criticism in their paintings. Emily was such a serious artist while the Ladies' Art Club wasn't so serious about art. Emily had also taught children art, which she found, was more successful. They were more eager to learn art than the ladies. She saw one of the children struggling to draw a flower and she said to her, " Cathy, are you trying to make an exact copy? That's what cameras are for! Be creative! You want to sketch of a flower that will let you feel it growing and let you see it enjoying the sunlight!" (Carr) The children she taught thinks she was a different sort of teacher because the other teachers want exact copies not like Emily's way which was much more interesting. Her inspirations of going to France were still there and she fulfilled it in 1910 when she was 38 years old. Artists there were developing paintings with spirit, which would express its mood and motion. She felt confident that this style could create her own technique. ...read more.

Conclusion

Yet, she was a strong character who loved art too much to be affected by fame or money. Years pasted, her health had become worse. She suffered heart attacks and strokes, which didn't stop her from painting though. When she was too ill to paint she started writing. She wrote about her childhood, Klee Wyck, and her accomplishments. She won an award for " Klee Wyck" for non-fiction in 1941. Sadly she died of a stroke on March 2nd 1945. Emily Carr had developed a distinctive Canadian style in art. She was also the first major woman artist to be recognized in Canada. She would be always be one of Canada's favourite and best-known artists. like what colours and how the colours match or not match,.,...what;s the contrast...how does the background bring out the objects in the front...bs Emily Carr, Self Portrait was a portrait of her. The colours she used were yellow, brown, blue and green. It makes her look lonely. Her eyes looks depressed. The lips are sort of like a frown. The background is a lot lighter than the object. It shows that the object is alone. I don't really like this portrait because it doesn't really show a good impression of Emily to me. Emily Carr, Woo, was a painting of a monkey she drew when she brought it. I liked the colours on the background. It seemed like a cheerful picture with the bright colours on the dress. The bow stands out the most because it had the brightest colour. Emily Carr Cumshewa, was a painting of a crow. ...read more.

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