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"Man Pointing" by Alberto Giacometti: A critical analysis.

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Introduction

"Man Pointing" by Alberto Giacometti: A critical analysis. "Man Pointing", or "Thin Man" is one of Alberto Giacometti's best known pieces of artwork, helping to carve his reputation as a superb sculptor. This piece was finished almost over-night in 1947. During the postwar period, this and many other pieces of his work such as "L'homme qui Marche"(The Man who Walks) and The Chariot gained popularity because his personal style reflected "Existentialism," which at that time struck a chord with the current philosophic views that were fashionable within society. Similar to several other of his pieces, it is a sculpture that evokes "space through a figure which marks the limits of its presence with an extended, space-encompassing arm." ...read more.

Middle

Looking closely, I am reminded of an asteroid's surface. This rough look adds to the feeling that the figure portrayed is poor, hungry, and desperate. His face is gaunt, his ribs sticking out of his chest. Both the eyes and the nose are distorted and elongated like the body. The eyes connote a look of confusion or sadness. Meanwhile, his mouth, which is somewhat agape, connotes a look of surprise or astonishment. The contour of the face, which is somewhat ovular, jagged and crater-like, creates shadows that serve to bring out the depth of this piece. All good artists transfer their emotions and 'soul' into their pieces of work. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, in the years prior to the war, he began to make a transition away from this art form to working with models, in sculptures and in paintings. Declared a heretic by fellow Surrealists, he went underground and continued to try to develop his newly adopted style. But success did not come easily. "To my horror, the sculptures became smaller and smaller...a large figure seemed to me untrue, a small one intolerable, and often they became so small that with one touch of my knife, they disappeared into dust.". Several more years of experimentation, refinement and frustration had passed when his vision became crystallized. His sense of reality had completely changed. "People and objects became mere blobs without meaning. It was a completely unknown sight. I had the impression that reality had completely changed. It was something never seen before." ...read more.

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