• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Show the Links Between Dada/Surrealism and Pop Art.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

AN ESSAY TO SHOW THE LINKS BETWEEN DADA/SURREALISM AND POP ART. Art comes in a great variety. Different periods inspire different movements, reflected in the work of the artists. However some of these movements do have their linkages. By looking aspects such as stimulation and influences of these movements is seems clear to establish the fact that many periods are linked to each other, some more obviously than others. Surrealism and Dada were the first chronologically out of the two. The first movement dated to the years of World War 1. After the war art in France split up into two styles. Both of the styles were linked to different ideas of ideologies. The first was Purism. Purism was the movement which promoted the idea that we should 'return to order' in both art and society. This was reflected in the works of artists which used Purism in their work. Purism as a whole rejected the more extreme work of the abstraction of cubism. However, very controversially, the Purists work was actually closely related to Cubism, although it was distinctly clear that the Purists works were considerably closer to the actual form than the Cubists. ...read more.

Middle

In this century it also admired, and included in its exhibitions, works by the Italian Giorgio de Chirico, the Russian Marc Chagall, the Swiss Paul Klee, the French artists Marcel Duchamp and Francis Picabia, and the Spaniard Pablo Picasso, none of whom was ever a member of the Surrealist group. From 1924 the German Max Ernst, the Frenchman Jean Arp, and the American painter and photographer Man Ray were among its members. They were joined for a short time around 1925 by the Frenchman André Masson and the Spaniard Joan Miró, who remained members for some time but were too individualistic as painters to submit to the strong leadership of André Breton, who exercised final authority over the movement. (SEE PICTURE 1) Salvador Dalí's The Persistence of Memory (1931) ranks as one of the most famous paintings of the 20th century. A surrealist, Dalí referred to his work as "hand-painted dream photographs", and claimed that his imagery often came directly from his own dreams. The strange form in this painting's foreground, however, is based on an image from Hieronymus Bosch's The Garden of Earthly Delights (c. 1505-1510).Assemblages would be constructed from bizarre combinations of images and objects isolated from the origins of everyday life; elevated to the world of Surrealism. ...read more.

Conclusion

An idea can be inspires negatively for example ,to be inspired to change the way someone does something. Pop art was like this as the movement itself, however, began as a reaction against the Abstract Expressionist style of the 1940s and 1950s, which the Pop Artists considered over-intellectual, subjective, and divorced from reality. Adopting the aim of the American composer John Cage-to close the gap between life and art-Pop Artists embraced the environment of everyday life.Pop art was the inspiration of artists to take a different perspective on surrealism, to take a more random commercial and powerful approach. The greatest link between Pop Art and Surrealism/Dada is the aims of artists. Pop artists aimed to be impersonal-that is, to allow the viewer to respond directly to the object, rather than to the skill and personality of the artist. Surrealists aimed to create images inspired by the unconscious to unlock the unconscious. Both movements aimed to put meaning into their work by one way or another. To conclude art is to inspire and to be inspired. Ideas are recycled and regurgitated over and over again. Links are obvious between some movements and less with others. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Art & Design section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Art & Design essays

  1. Modernism - Nearly every Modernist movement employed abstraction; it is more a question of ...

    contested the ideal of divine creation. Karl Marx's communist ideology, expounded most notably in "The Communist Manifesto" (1848) and "Das Kapital," (Three volumes, 1867, 1885 and 1894) introduced many new, challenging concepts to the fields of politics and social examination. Such theories invited artists to examine their own thinking in a new light, resulting ultimately in the exploration and expression of boldly new artistic principles.

  2. Art Essay

    o Heart wrenching in its impact on the audience's emotions. o The work as whole impacts the audiences' emotions, leaving them uncomfortable and on edge - highly emotionally charged. o The racial references inform the audiences of the artist's subjective experiences as well as a generation's experience by making sub

  1. Gustav Stresemann, the most influential German politician from 1923-1929 helped Germany, in many ways ...

    The sources also tell me that the 1920's were a time of free society and freedom of speech. For example some key painters of the time used art to criticise society ("Neue Sachlichkeit") and there were significant developments in other fields too which resulted in some of the most innovative and exciting art and culture in Europe.

  2. Art essay Thesis: what elements of Dada and Surrealism suggest the influence of ...

    They were both driven by that time's political structure, however, "Hopkins" states that both Surrealist and Dada's "attitudes range of key topics from irrationalism to sexuality, before focusing closely on their politics." (Hopkins) And after I have bestowed the readers with a very short introduction on both art movements, and

  1. Examine the Term "Modernism" with reference to two or three works of Art

    In these places he was free to obtain a child like, more powerfully decorative use of colour and shape. His "Vairaumati" (1897) for example, shows the labour of a man free from any organisational duties. The body of a young exotic girl is simplified and filled with bold warm colour.

  2. Does Religious Art have any Relevance in Today's Society?

    Sandra- It'd be nice to have the pope in but eh... Graham- Aye, he just passed but, when he visited the city Sandra- Aye he passed but I think that's just as far as it goes So do you think that religious art has had an influence on popular culture or vice versus?

  1. Line " the essence of art, the language of free expression.

    Looking at his 'Study of Praying Hands' what was most impressive are the details of the prayer hands where it is similar to Da Vinci's. Like Da Vinci, Durer also uses Line to create depth and make it appear realistic.

  2. Surrealism - artists and techniques.

    He was also pacifist, and having lived through both World War 1 and 2 he had strong feelings and strong a fear of any type of war. His famous book, Arcane 17, explains this. It was his political mind and his feeling of war that was expressed in his art.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work