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Catering research

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

3. Key Note Primary Research INTRODUCTION In December 2007, field research into the occasions when consumers choose to eat out was conducted by NEMS Market Research on behalf of Key Note. The survey was carried out by telephone among a nationally representative sample of 1,000 adults aged 16 and over, resident in Great Britain. The topline findings are shown in Table 3.1, which, for the purpose of comparing trends, also includes the findings from similar surveys conducted in 2004 and 2005 by BMRB Access and in 2006 by NEMS Market Research. Table 3.1: Popular Occasions for Eating Out (% of respondents), 2004-2007 "Which, if any, of the following statements about eating do you agree with?" 2004 2005 2006 2007 I eat out during special occasions and get-togethers 92.0 92.1 89.7 88.9 I eat out while away on holiday 88.0 86.9 89.1 87.7 I eat out while shopping 43.0 50.5 51.8 49.5 I eat out before or after going to the cinema/theatre 44.0 41.1 40.8 44.1 I eat out at airports 39.0 38.8 40.7 40.4 I eat out at Sunday lunchtimes 38.0 46.0 34.5 39.1 I eat out before or after going to the pub in the evening 30.0 34.0 36.2 35.9 I eat out at motorway service areas 30.0 27.8 30.5 30.2 I eat out for snacks between meals 25.0 23.9 25.6 25.4 I eat out for weekday breakfasts 11.0 10.4 13.5 12.1 I eat out at railway stations 8.0 7.5 8.2 7.7 Base: 1,000 adults aged 16+ in 2007 (1,023 in 2006, 1,003 in 2005, 901 in 2004) Source: Key Note/NEMS Market Research, 2006 and 2007/BMRB Access, 2004 and 2005 In 2007, the two most popular occasions for eating out remained special occasions/get-togethers and while away on holiday, which were cited by 88.9% and 87.7% of respondents, respectively. The next most popular situation for eating out was while shopping, which applied to almost half (49.5%) ...read more.

Middle

Developments that continue to benefit the sector include pub refurbishments, improvements in the quality and value of food on offer, and the introduction of new and more varied menus. The persistent decline in beer sales in pubs is encouraging pub owners to attach more importance to, and place greater emphasis on, food sales. Table 5.2: The UK Pub-Restaurants Sector by Value at Current Prices (�m at rsp and %), 2003-2007 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Value (�m at rsp) 1,950 2,150 2,350 2,565 2,700 % change year-on-year - 10.3 9.3 9.1 5.3 Sector share of total market (%) 21.8 23.2 24.0 24.9 25.2 rsp - retail selling prices Note: data include eat-in restaurants in bars. Source: Key Note Roadside Restaurants Roadside restaurants are basically functional places that provide a refreshment break for people who are travelling. They are not usually seen as locations to be visited specifically for an evening meal. The sector is generally divided between restaurants situated on A roads (including the Little Chef chain) and those situated at motorway service areas. Key Note estimates that the roadside restaurants sector was worth �715m in 2007, having increased by 2.9% on 2006 and by 10% over the review period (see Table 5.3). Value growth tends to be limited by the fact that travellers who use roadside caf�s are usually seeking food that is both good and economically priced. Increasing fuel costs have also had an effect on this sector, in that they have deterred some drivers from making long journeys and, consequently, using the services provided by roadside restaurants. However, the sector maintained its share of the total restaurants market, at 6.7%, in 2007. Table 5.3: The UK Roadside Restaurants Sector by Value at Current Prices (�m at rsp and %), 2003-2007 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Value (�m at rsp) 650 660 675 695 715 % change year-on-year - 1.5 2.3 3.0 2.9 Sector share of total market (%) ...read more.

Conclusion

In general, penetration of restaurant visits is higher in the evening than it is in the daytime for most types of restaurant, the only exception being hamburger bars. Table 5.13: Users of Restaurants in the Last 3 Months by Type of Restaurant (% of adults), 2007 Day Evening Anytime Pub restaurant 22.9 30.4 41.7 Chinese restaurant 6.2 20.2 23.7 Indian restaurant 2.9 21.3 22.9 English restaurant 8.3 13.3 18.4 Italian restaurant 4.8 14.5 17.0 Pizza restaurant 8.1 11.1 16.4 Steak house 2.4 7.2 8.8 Indonesian/Thai restaurant 1.1 5.5 6.1 Mexican 0.8 4.3 4.9 American-style restaurant 1.6 3.9 4.8 Hamburger bar 3.8 1.4 4.6 French restaurant 1.5 3.4 4.2 Spanish restaurant 1.2 3.2 3.8 Greek/Turkish restaurant 0.8 2.9 3.4 Japanese 0.6 1.4 1.9 Other 5.3 8.2 11.5 Source: Target Group Index (TGI), (c) BMRB International Ltd, 2007 FORECASTS 2008 TO 2012 Key Note forecasts that the UK restaurants market will increase in value by 4% at current prices in 2008, to reach �11.14bn (see Table 5.14). Thereafter, year-on-year growth is expected to increase, raising the value of the market to �13.66bn in 2012, which represents growth of 22.6% over the forecast period (2008 to 2012). Table 5.14: The Forecast UK Restaurants Market by Value at Current Prices (�m at rsp), 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Value (�m at rsp) 11,140 11,640 12,220 12,890 13,660 % change year-on-year 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.5 6.0 rsp - retail selling prices Note: data include caf� meals. Source: Key Note However, the outlook for consumer spending in the UK in 2008 is uncertain and this could have an impact on eating out. The first winter of the English smoking ban will also be challenging, although the evidence from Scotland suggests that the ban will prove to be beneficial in the longer term. On a more positive note, consumer demand for greater choice, quality and service will continue to benefit the higher-priced restaurant chains, and the pub-restaurant sector should remain fairly buoyant. Roadside restaurants will continue to be the least dynamic sector of the market, but the broad `other restaurants' sector is forecast to maintain reasonable growth. ...read more.

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