• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

discuss the extent to which different stakeholders would regard BPL as a successful business

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

4. With reference to Appendix 3 and any other relevant information, discuss the extent to which different stakeholders would regard BPL as a successful business (18 marks) Appendix 3 shows that the total amount of dividend, amounting to �50,000, was paid to shareholders of BPL in 2010, the same amount as the previous year. Wilhelm mentions that "most" shareholders are also golf club members and thus BPL represents a "lifestyle choice rather than [a] financial investment" for BPL's shareholders. It can be assumed, since there is no mention of any unrest from shareholders within the case study - as an aiming "luxury leisure destination" business in BPL - that shareholders would regard BPL as successful, for the "most" part. However BPL has shareholders that are not members of the golf course that are more likely to be inclined for a financial reward. ...read more.

Middle

Shareholders of BPL would be the top stakeholder group to see BPL as successful, since it offers a luxury service as well as a financially rewarding business, satisfying the listed wants of stakeholders in the case. Sue Bell, BLP's Hotel manager, has been set the objective from Wilhelm of "getting room occupancy up to 75% by the end of 2013". In 2007 BPL had an average room occupancy percentage of 74.25%, which has fallen year-on-year to only 56% in 2010. Sue raises concerns about the way overheads are allocated across BLP's various profit centres, of which she feels puts a "disproportionate cost burden on the hotel". It can be seen in the case that BLP charges up to a published �780 per room/night, a figure that is potentially too high in Sue's belief to, due to her opinion of BLP's cost structure, therefore possibly making it hard for Sue to achieve her objective set by Wilhelm. ...read more.

Conclusion

Although the balance sheet shouldn't be studied in isolation, it's is just a snapshot at the date at which it is recorded, since the figures often fluctuate and it is limited in the fact that it doesn't show opinions of BPL's stakeholders. Taking other factors into account, shareholders should be happy as they gain financially as well as personally. Although it should be highlighted that this opinion is based around Wilhelms perceptions of shareholders, it may actually be shareholders are more interested in a financial investment than he makes out. Sue Bell may not see BPL as successful because of her own issues, which are not reflected in the balance sheet, although these issues were in the past, not the present. It's not fully conclusive to give an exact extent on how different stakeholders would regard BPL as successful as the data in the case is outdated and possibly untrue. Only by gaining the opinion of different stakeholders can it be seen whether stakeholders see BPL as successful, and even then stakeholders may hold different interpretations on what "successful" is. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Case Studies and Analysis section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Case Studies and Analysis essays

  1. Unit 9: Marketing Strategy

    The aspect of this matrix which applies to my business is an existing product in an existing market meaning that my business will be performing market penetration. Market penetration is when sales increase of an existing product in its current market.

  2. PEST is a planning tool which is used by a business to evaluate and ...

    This PEST factor could be significant to Ginsters as it could directly affect their ability to achieve the aim / objective of becoming the UK's savoury product market leader this is because Ginsters will have to change their packaging in order to decrease their effect on their environment.

  1. The main purpose of this research is to know and analyze whether the Olympic ...

    The research methodology process will include two different types of the research methods such as the quantitative research method as well as the qualitative research method. Depending on the different types of the factors the types of the research

  2. Applied Business Studies Unit 7: Career Planning

    Once she has finished that she could be doing any number of different things, for example she might have meetings organised with clients or prospective clients. Theses could be to discuss a number of things for example; budget, concept of the event, progress reports and so on.

  1. SWOT and Pestel analysis for Carlton Forum leisure centre

    By doing a PESTEL analysis this can help give a firm an advantage and a outlook on what could happen in the future both good and bad, although it isn't a precise predictor of things to come it is a great tool to use within any business.

  2. Hilton Hotel and a B&B analysed

    Examples of these are businesses like local bakeries, launderettes, hairdressers etc. In contrast, clicks-and-mortar businesses have an online presence for trading. They use the Web as a shop window to trade electronically, as consumers purchase their products directly over the Web.

  1. Nestle stakeholders and business environment

    Their supplier base includes: direct suppliers (approximately 165 000 companies), 680 000 individual farmers Interest/aspiration High Low Key players (Customers) Keep satisfied (Shareholders) Keep informed (Community) Minimal effort High Power/influence Low 2.2. Responsibilities of Nestlé and the strategy to accomplish 2.2.1.

  2. SWOT Analysis for the Mahal Palace Hotel, Mumbai

    includes human competencies, process capabilities, financial resources, products and services, customer goodwill and brand loyalty. 4. Strengths refer to aspects of the business that adds value to the product. 5. Examples of organization strengths are huge financial resources, broad product line, no debt, committed employees, etc.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work