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NETFLIX CUSTOMERS SATISFACTION

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Introduction

Running Head: NETFLIX CUSTOMER'S SATISFACTION Netflix customer's satisfaction [Name of the writer] [Name of the institution] Abstract Customer satisfaction is ?n import?nt issue for org?niz?tion, p?rticul?rly those in services industries like Netflix. However, it ?ppe?rs th?t ?chieving customer satisfaction is often the end go?l, ?s evidenced by the emph?sis on customer satisfaction surveys. This p?per proposes th?t this focus is due to the ?ssumption th?t s?tisfied customer's ?re loy?l customer's ?nd thus high levels of satisfaction will le?d to incre?sed s?les. ?s ? result of this ?ssumption, customer satisfaction is often used ?s ? proxy for loy?lty ?nd other outcomes. The rese?rchers empiric?lly demonstr?te th?t satisfaction is not the s?me ?s ?ttitudin?l loy?lty ?nd th?t there ?re inst?nces where satisfaction does not result in loy?lty. ? s?mple w?s selected due to the relev?nce of satisfaction ?nd ?ttitudes in settings of high risk where ? high level of decision m?king is involved. ? s?mple of customers w?s surveyed on their satisfaction ?nd ?ttitudin?l loy?lty levels tow?rds Netflix service. The results indic?te th?t satisfaction in ? Netflix ?re different constructs, ?nd th?t, while the rel?tionship is positive, high levels of satisfaction do not ?lw?ys yield high levels of loy?lty. TABLE OF CONTENT CH?PTER 1: INTRODUCTION 1 INTRODUCTION 1 COMPANY OVERVIEW 3 STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM 4 PURPOSE OF STUDY 5 SIGNIFIC?NCE OF THE STUDY 6 CH?PTER 2: LITER?TURE REVIEW 7 CUSTOMER SATISFACTION 7 MODELS OF CUSTOMER SATISFACTION 21 CYCLE OF CUSTOMER SATISFACTION 22 IMPORTANCE OF CUSTOMER SATISFACTION FOR THE FIRM 23 E-SERVICE ?ND THE EXTERN?L CUSTOMER 25 ?NNUITY SATISFACTION 26 CUSTOMER SATISFACTION VS CUSTOMER DISSATISFACTION 27 CUSTOMER DISSATISFACTION 27 CONFIRM?TION / DISCONFIRM?TION 28 REL?TIONSHIP BETWEEN CUSTOMER SATISFACTION ?ND LOY?LTY 28 CUSTOMER SATISFACTION ?ND CUSTOMER LOY?LTY 29 CONSUMER SATISFACTION ?ND REL?TIONSHIP M?RKETING THEORY 30 REL?TIONSHIP SATISFACTION ?ND S?LESPERSON 31 ROLE OF TRUST IN CUSTOMER REL?TIONSHIP 31 COMMITMENT ?ND CUSTOMER REL?TIONSHIP 32 REL?TIONSHIP BETWEEN SERVICE QU?LITY ?ND CUSTOMER SATISFACTION 33 CUSTOMER SATISFACTION ?ND V?LUE 33 REL?TIONSHIP BETWEEN M?RKETING ?ND CUSTOMER SATISFACTION 35 COMMUNIC?TION ?ND CUSTOMER SATISFACTION 36 ...read more.

Middle

product or ? service exceed the offering's life cycle costs to the customer. ?ccording to customer v?lue liter?ture, it could be confusing bec?use it m?y bring to mind very different concept, ?lthough rese?rch confirms the study of customer v?lue is in inf?ncy (Rust & Oliver, 1994). Liter?ture suggests th?t customer v?lue h?s two rel?ted me?ning. Most commonly, customer v?lue me?ns judgments or ?ssessments of wh?t ? customer perceives he or she h?s received from ? seller in ? specific purch?se or use situ?tion (Zeith?ml, 1988). The other me?ning, desired v?lue, refers to wh?t customers w?nt to h?ve h?ppen when inter?cting with ? supplier ?nd or using the supplier's product or service (Rust & Oliver, 1994). For ex?mple, this concept is simil?r to the notion of customer desires in the satisfaction liter?ture. ?ccording to some studies, customer rel?tionship ?nd customer v?lue should be subject to closer scrutiny. However, very few rese?rchers h?ve devoted much ?ttention to v?lue which, in connection with services, is described by Zeith?ml ?s the key competitive f?ctor defining the w?y services ?re bought ?nd sold. Customer v?lue is ?n import?nt construct in ?ttributing the products' perform?nce. P?r?sur?m?n et ?l, (1988) points out th?t customer v?lue is ? customer's perceived preference for ?n ev?lu?tion of those product ?ttribute, ?ttribute perform?nces, ?nd consequences ?rising from using th?t f?cilit?te (or block) ?chieving the customer's go?ls ?nd purposes in use situ?tion Rel?tionship between M?rketing ?nd Customer Satisfaction There is ? signific?nt link between rel?tionship m?rketing ?nd customer satisfactions. ?ccording to ?lex and Seine (2000) rel?tionship m?rketing theory focuses on m?rket rel?tionships, on buyer-seller rel?tionships, ?nd researcher exclude other st?ke holder rel?tionships ?t this ph?se. ?fter ?ll, buyer ?nd seller rel?tionships ?re the core issue in rel?tionship m?rketing, ?nd the whole m?rketing discipline. Rel?tionship m?rketing theory is the key to influence import?nt outcomes for the firm ?nd ? better underst?nding of the c?us?l rel?tions between these drivers ?nd outcomes. ...read more.

Conclusion

Moreover, bec?use the results ?re b?sed on ? Netflix, c?ution must be used when gener?lizing the results to Netflix. Despite these limit?tions, the results reported in this study gener?lly suggest th?t empowerment progr?ms cre?te customer satisfaction. However, the process by which such progr?ms cre?te customer satisfaction is not cle?r from results reported in this p?per. This l?ck of cl?rity holds import?nt implic?tions for future rese?rch. In the se?rch to deline?te this process, future rese?rch efforts might focus on resolving the issue of whether or not empowerment progr?ms le?d to customer satisfaction independently from qu?lity improvement progr?ms such ?s TQM. Further rese?rch This study h?s investig?ted issues rel?ting to the rel?tionship between satisfaction ?nd loy?lty identified in previous rese?rch, thus the other two need further investig?tion. The rel?tionship between satisfaction ?nd loy?lty is not line?r ?nd is moder?ted by psychologic?l ?nd situ?tion?l v?ri?bles (Oliver, 1999). This rel?tionship needs to be modeled for business-to business services. Methodologic?l issues need to be considered when ?ssessing the rel?tionship between satisfaction ?nd loy?lty. The link between satisfaction ?nd loy?lty would be better demonstr?ted through the elimin?tion of respondents who f?ll into the "zone of indifference". ? technique for ?chieving this is the terti?l split, where the middle third is elimin?ted from st?tistic?l ?n?lysis. There is no evidence of tempor?l ?ntecedence between satisfaction ?nd loy?lty in the liter?ture, which is interesting given the cl?im th?t satisfaction le?ds to loy?lty. Yet this cl?im is l?rgely untested with longitudin?l d?t?. Future rese?rch is required to test the ordering of the rel?tionship. For inst?nce, ?re satisfaction ?nd ?ttitudin?l loy?lty simply correl?ted, or does one le?d to the other? Longitudin?l studies ?re required to test competing models. The first model would hypothesize th?t ?ttitudin?l loy?lty ?nd satisfaction ?re formed simult?neously, while the competing model would t?ke the tr?dition?l view th?t satisfaction is ?ntecedent to ?ttitudin?l loy?lty. It is likely th?t satisfaction is not ?ntecedent to ?ttitudin?l loy?lty, ?s they ?re both intern?l constructs/?ttitude components. ...read more.

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