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Orange - Creation and launch.

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Introduction

ORANGE- CREATION AND LAUNCH (Introduction) In 1994 Orange launched into an already crowded UK marketplace. We needed to differentiate ourselves from the other three players in order to succeed. Before the launch, a team of people from Orange (then called Hutchison Microtel), corporate identity specialists Wolff Olins, and advertising agency WCRS set about creating the brand. The vision was to be the most personal telecommunications company in the world, and to be honest and open in dealing with customers and employees alike. The brand had to be something that people would engage with on an emotional level as well as delivering tangible benefits to them. The team refined the core brand idea from four options - the manager, the innovator, it's my life, and it's my friend. The result was 'it's my phone' which combined the best elements from the four. Names were brainstormed and the shortlist included Pecan, Gemini, Egg, Miro, and, of course Orange. "Orange" was the name that best represented the team's ideas, with its connotations of fun, optimism, liveliness and freedom. Market research found that people thought the name was distinctive and friendly, extrovert, modern and powerful. The name Orange was then registered as a trademark. With a name secured, logo development began. An orange square with 'orange' simply written in lowercase white lettering was the concept that shone through. Simple and distinctive, it helped remove associations with the fruit and supported the aims of being straightforward and honest By January 1994 advertising had been developed and the full corporate identity for Orange was finalised soon afterwards. After extensive customer research into people's likes and dislikes of their current providers, Orange defined its values that helped shape the personality of the brand. These are honest, straightforward, friendly, refreshing and dynamic. WCRS created the award winning launch advertising campaign and our brand line 'the future's bright, the future's Orange' was born. ...read more.

Middle

In April 1994, Orange entered the UK market as the last entrant in a field of four, with an ambitious aim: to become the first choice in wirefree(tm) communications. To achieve this, Orange began building a strong, fresh, clear identity that set it apart from the clutter that characterised a market littered with high-tech jargon and complicated pricing (see also next section 'Orange story'). It was the start of a revolution. Orange innovations like simple Talk Plans that offered real value for money, per second billing, Caller ID, itemised billing free of charge, and direct customer relationships changed people's attitudes about mobile communications. By the end of 1995 the Orange customer base had more than doubled to 785,000, compared to 379,000 at the end of 1994. In 1996, Orange plc underwent its first initial public offering with the shares being listed on the London and Nasdaq markets on 2 April 1996. At flotation in London, Orange plc shares were priced at 205 pence. Major shareholders at the time were Hutchison Whampoa with 48%, and British Aerospace with 22%. With a valuation of �2.4 billion, Orange plc became the youngest company to enter the FTSE-100. In July 1997 the company reached its first milestone of 1 million customers. Orange plc was named the best performing share in 1998, based on companies listed on the FTSE-100 throughout the year. In June 1999 Orange won the Nat West/Sunday Times Business Enterprise Award, which described Orange as "one of the outstanding business success stories of the past few years" and the Orange story as one of "courageous vision and commitment to the long-running potential of mobile telecom". Orange began to expand internationally, with interests in Austria, Belgium and Switzerland - the first steps towards fulfilling a global ambition. By the end of 1999, Orange had also licensed its brand to operators in Hong Kong, Australia, Israel and India. ...read more.

Conclusion

In the ways outlined above, there are many steps from where we are today, and all the evidence and experience to date supports the strong belief we have. MISSION STATEMENT A Mission statement is a written statement setting out the aim of a business- sometimes it also lists business objectives. ORANGE MISSION STATEMENT 'The future's bright, the future's is orange' The Orange mission statement is stated above and it is so obvious looking at the mission statement what orange means by it. What they are trying to say with this mission statement is that no matter the competition that comes before them they will overcome it and also that Orange will be around for years to come that's why the future is bright for them. The mission statement also signifies that Orange will not fade out of business that's why the future is theirs. BUSINESS FUNCTIONS AND STRUCTURES Whatever the size of the business- whether it's a sole trader or PLC - or whatever the product, the factors of production are combined in a variety of functions. These include: * Production- using the factors of production to produce a manufactured product or a service- it is the basic function of any business. * Research and development- investigating new products and new ways of producing existing products. * Finance- the control of money and the recording and reporting of money transactions- a central function in any business. * Marketing and sales- finding MANAGEMENT STYLES For managers to be effective they need to adopt a style of management, which suits the structure, and culture of the organisations in ethic they work. It is also important that a managers able to change his or her style of management depending on the situation. There are four main styles of management, which are recognised as being effective if used at the right time. Autocratic Managers who adopt an autocratic style of management will take full responsibility for everything and keep all their authority to themselves. They will tell their staff what to do it and will expect to be obeyed without discussion. 1 Kolawole Falana ...read more.

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