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Review on Management Styles

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Introduction

Management Styles Within an organisation one of the factors that has to be taken into account when choosing how a business is run is management styles, this is the way in which a manager goes about running a business and defines the inputs employees have in the business. Management styles vary in organisations and vary depending on the type of character a manager has. Management styles show the way in which a managers regulate employee's activity. There are many different styles of management; many of these can be defined under the following headings... * Democratic * Consultative * Autocratic * Supportive * Collaborative * Passive * Directive These management styles will differ with each manager and depending on the culture of the organisation they could be used in various situations to ensure the smooth running of the business. Democratic A democratic management style is that of which a manager takes the views of employees into consideration and allows them to have a say in the running of the business. The management objective by using a democratic style is to allow the employees to have an influence over their working conditions. A manager who is democratic is likely to spread the workload out among the employees. ...read more.

Middle

An autocratic management style may also put a lot of pressure on a manager as they have to be responsible for a lot of decision making and this may cause problems for them. Supportive A supportive management style enables the employees to learn from their work place. The employees gradually start to fit into their role in the workplace and learn skills and make friends from it. Supportive managers seek to have employees developing their skills and producing a better output to the company. Supportive management is all about trying to help out employees keep on top of aspects in the workplace by speaking with them and helping them when they need it. Supportive managers are useful to help employees with personal problems, such as supporting employees who have children and helping them find methods of having their children cared for whilst they are working. Supportive management in many ways can help employees feel empowered, supportive managers will take into account ideas from employees and this can help bring new ideas to the business. Supportive managers can give employees time to help come up with new ideas, employees can then forward these ideas to the managers who will help them progress. ...read more.

Conclusion

Directive Directive management involves the most common type of management used in organisations, directive management involves decisions being made from people at the top of the organisation and these instructions are then passed down the organisation and carried out by the subordinates of the organisation. This type of management is useful in less creative industries such as restaurants where more structured decision making is necessary. This type of management is also useful when sap decisions have to be made, such as an escape from a building that has caught fire. With a directive management style it is not likely that creativity is going to be encouraged as the managers make decisions regarding how parts of the business are to be carried out. This type of management is also likely to make employees feel less empowered as they are generally directed by management as to how they should carry out their jobs. Overall these management strategies are effective in many ways however in different situations some will be more effective than others. The styles managers use will have various impacts on employees and the way they function and operate, managers will have to adapt their styles to different situations to ensure maximum productivity is obtained from all employees. Employee motivation and business revenue will all be affected by a management style. ?? ?? ?? ?? Keith Reid 14bsy ...read more.

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