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Structure of the Leisure & Recreation Industry.

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Introduction

Structure of the Leisure & Recreation Industry Traditionally, leisure facilities & activities have been provided by 3 sectors: In recent years the differences between them have become less pronounced, and a provider in one sector may have characteristics which are usually associated with another sector. Such overlap is normal, but it is useful to recognise these variations when carrying out analysis of observations. Here is an example: * Wimbledon Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club and Queens club are voluntary sector clubs where for most of the year their ordinary members play tennis. Yet for three weeks of every year they stage 2 of the biggest and most commercial tennis events in the world. Despite overlaps, each sector still maintains a distinctive profile as a result of its purpose and the way each is controlled and funded. Private Sector The primary objective of private sector organisations is to make a profit. If they fail to make a profit they go out of business. To make a profit they need to produce services and goods at a cost that is less than that at which they sell them. They are also in competition with other leisure providers and need to maintain value for money to keep prices down in order to retain their market share. ...read more.

Middle

The government has four main functions: 1. Planning and control - setting the boundaries for leisure provision to ensure that development of the industry is in line with government policies 2. Marketing - promoting the benefits of leisure activities 3. Financial distribution - providing funding through distribution of government monies 4. Co-ordination - ensuring that the activities carried out by different government organisations and departments do not conflict The Sports Council There are four Sports Councils in the UK - one each for England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. Sources of funding: * National government * Commercial activities * Sponsorship from the private sector for specific activities Aims: * To increase participation in sport and physical recreation * To increase the quantity and quality of sports facilities * To raise standards of performance * To provide information for and about sport Activities: * Make grants and loans to local authorities to fund community facilities and projects * Provide funds to national sports governing bodies for improving administration, participation, coaching and training standards * Run national publicity campaigns * Run the National Sports Centres * Administer and distribute sports and recreation grants from National Lottery funds The home country sports councils also manage the thirteen national sports centres including: * Bisham Abbey - tennis, ...read more.

Conclusion

Private Clubs- are run as businesses and aim to make a profit for the owners. They are managed by employees of the company. Income is mainly from membership fees, green fees(payments made by non-members who play the course), tuition and retail sales of golf equipment, clothes and accessories. Many private clubs also provide other leisure and recreation facilities such as bars, restaurants, conference facilities, fitness suites and squash courts. Some diversify more widely into hotels and timeshare or second home developments. Municipal Courses- aim to provide a service to the local community. They are publicly owned and managed by employees of the local authority. Income is mainly from 'pay as you play' fees, although some municipal courses have members as well. Extra income comes from tuition, catering and retail sales. Less than 20% of golf courses in the UK are currently publicly owned. Voluntary-sector Clubs- are owned by their members. They aim to satisfy the needs and wants of members, and to break even. They are run by a committee of members and usually employ a steward to manage the facility. Their main sources of income are membership and green fees. Non-members pay a temporary membership fee allowing them to play the course for a limited time, such as a day. ...read more.

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