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The aim of this report is to discuss the role of management in organisations and assess the relative importance of information as a system.

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Introduction

1. TERMS OF REFERENCE 1 2. INTRODUCTION 1 3. ROLE OF MANAGEMENT 2 4. IMPORTANCE OF INFORMATION 3 5. FINANCE 4 6. RAW MATERIALS 5 8. PLANT AND EQUIPMENT 7 9. CONCLUSION 8 REFERENCES 9 1. TERMS OF REFERENCE The aim of this report is to discuss the role of management in organisations and assess the relative importance of information as a system. 2. INTRODUCTION Organisations employ various resources such as finance, raw materials, people, plant and equipment in order to achieve their objectives and this will be discussed in more detail. An organisation is a group of individuals who work together in order to achieve objectives and to provide satisfaction for their members. (Mullins, 1993). There are a various different types of organisations set up to meet individuals needs. (Mullins, 1993). There are three common factors in every organisation which are people, objectives and structure. (Internet site 1). For an organisation to be effective it depends on the quality of its people, objectives and structure and resources available. There are two categories of resources: > Non-human - physical assets, materials and facilities and > Human - members abilities and influence, and their management. (Mullins, 1993). 3. ROLE OF MANAGEMENT In organisations there are a number of various skills required in the role of management such as: > Communication - learn to listen and be observant > At least ten years working in a field similar to those being managed > Leadership - a true leader, is willing to do any task which is necessary to ...read more.

Middle

(Internet site 5). Most organisations main aim is to earn a profit, to achieve this managers require financial control and they mite carefully analyze quarterly income statement for excessive expenses. . They might also perform several financial ratio tests to ensure that sufficient cash is available to pay on going expenses. (Robbins, 2005) Organisations require a finance department as they deal with all the accounts of the organisation and see how much income the organisation is generating. The finance department deals with all the financial affairs of an organisation and their main activities are: > Financial planning - predict future financial requirements and the amount of income that will be generated for decision making, strategic planning and plans for raising the finance required to support the business strategy. (Armstrong, 1999). > Financial accounting - recording all financial transactions, preparing balance sheets, profit & loss, value added statements, handling depreciation and inflation accounting. (Armstrong 1999). 6. RAW MATERIALS Most organisations have a control system which is inventory control. (Bartol, 1998). Inventory is a stock of materials that are used to facilitate production or to satisfy customer demand. (Bartol, 1998). There are three major types of inventory: > Raw materials > Work in process > Finished goods Raw materials inventory - is the stock of parts, ingredients and other inputs to a production or service process, for example, the raw materials inventory at Mc Donald's would be the hamburgers, cheese slices and buns. ...read more.

Conclusion

> Decide where plant should be located and the type of technology to use. (Appleby, 1994) The size of production should be considered wisely, bearing in mind the uncertainty of long term forecasts. If maximum expected demand is met, this can lead to surplus capacity, which may or may not be able to be utilised, as under utilised plant is not economical. (Appleby, 1994). Factors critical to the decision of the location should be carefully considered. Conventional location reasons are, raw materials, skilled labour availability, financial incentives and transport. (Appleby, 1994). Organisations must ensure that they pay a great deal of attention to the maintenance of the plant and equipment as failure to do so may lead to plant failure and consequent delays in production. (Appleby, 1994). Organisations should make sure the maintenance of buildings, plant and machinery to ensure efficient working order and make sure regular inspection is done and attention is paid to any breakdowns and that tools and equipment are in good working order. (Appleby, 1994). 9. CONCLUSION As it has been discussed there are many important factors in an organisation in order for them to achieve their objectives. They employ various resources to become successful organisations. The role of management has been analysed and what the main functions of management are and how they operate to ensure everything in the organisation runs efficiently and effectively. Information has also been assessed and why is information important and what it is used for in organisations and how it helps organisations to achieve their objectives. ...read more.

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