• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

According to the Res Gestae and Suetonius' Life of Augustus, how effective were Augustus' reforms to the Roman army and senate?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

According to the Res Gestae and Suetonius' Life of Augustus, how effective were Augustus' reforms to the Roman army and senate? Augusts (born Gaius Octavius Thurinus), claimed by some to be the first Roman emperor, made many reforms to the Roman army and senate which strengthened his rule and increased the power, influence and control of the empire. Augustus' reforms redrew and secured the frontiers of the empire and made the army far more efficient and manageable. Other reforms restored the respect and credibility of the senate and made it more efficient at the same time, just as he did with the army. A lot of the information about these reforms comes from two major historical sources, the first being the Res Gestae Divi Augusti - written by Augustus himself. It is an account of his achievements, similar to an autobiography but more factual rather than opinionated in nature. As it was written by Augustus, it creates the problem of neutrality, bias and a vested interest to lie to improve the way that he is viewed by those reading it - much like a piece of propaganda. Undeniably, the Res Gestae provides many facts that are true and it is implausible that Augustus could've made up facts that were wholly untrue but many things such as assassinations and battles are glossed over and mention only in passing or indirectly. ...read more.

Middle

the embarrassing loss caused by the general Varus in which 3 troops were massacred when recklessly led into a forest leading to them being ambushed. Augustus' reforms to the senate were no less significant, and the reason and drive behind the reforms was to make the Senate more effective as a government, making them more respectable in his eyes and in the eyes of the Roman citizens. Suetonius described this situation by claiming that "The sight of this sad and ill-assorted rabble decided Augustus to restore the Order to its former size and repute by two new acts of enrolment." (Suetonius, Life of Augustus) Augustus was clearly not satisfied with the members of the senate and wanted to restore the Senate's former glory and reputation in the eyes of the Roman people as they had become "popularly known as the 'Orcus Men'". Orcus was God of the underworld, so it could be interpreted as men of the underworld or servants of the god of the underworld, which is a clear indicator that the senators weren't particularly highly regarded and were, to some extent, ridiculed by the people of Rome, which would no doubt motivate Augustus to restore the senate to its former glory. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, it can also be deduced that the senatorial reforms were definitely suited to strengthen the personal power desired by Augustus as he could now control the topics and speakers to suit his own preference. This meant that the reforms were effective in both ways - to strengthen his rule and to make the Empire more powerful and prosperous. His military reforms were intended to keep the Empire at peace, and expand to the critical amount, which were both done effectively, according to Suetonius. Allegedly, a testament of Augustus warned against expanding the empire which would imply that Augustus military reforms were not especially expansive as much as aimed at making the army more effective and well-led, as he did with the Senate. Suetonius documents the reforms introduced well but seems to focus more individual reforms to the senate and more general reforms to the army, which are also fewer in number. It is far less biased than the Res Gestae, which doesn't document very many reforms at all concentrating, understandably, on the personal achievements of Augustus as it was written by the man himself resulting in less emphasis on the specific changes made as much as their successes. The two sources document the reforms in detail, and according to them, they were effective and introduced with the best intentions. - 4 - ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Classics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Classics essays

  1. To what extent did the Roman emperor Augustus restore the republic?

    In 27BC Augustus also offers the Senate all of his powers would also suggest that Augustus was a true republican but like the powers he rejected can realistically be concluded to be a political charade and propaganda stunt. I therefore believe that whilst the powers that Augustus held acted within

  2. Political success depended upon military success. To what extent do the sources support the ...

    His military successes include his achievement to put down the Spartacus revolt even though his triumph was stolen by Pompey. Maybe, that's why when he failed to rise constitutionally through military command he alternatively got involved in the indented massacre of the Senate.

  1. To what extent did Augustus use the building programme to beautify Rome.

    these ties are cemented by the dolphin that Cupid rides upon which was Venus' patron animal. Augustus' bare feet also allude to this semi-divinity. The breastplate that Augustus wears on the Prima Porta is significant in reflecting Augustus piety and desires to project such a public image.

  2. To what extent does the architecture of Rome highlight the aims of the emperors?

    emperors to maintain the happiness of the plebeians through the provision of entertainment. The most prominent example of this would be the construction of the Flavian Amphitheatre begun by Vespasian and completed by Titus at great expense demonstrating the desire of the Flavians to keep the people on side with entertainment.

  1. To what extent does the evidence support the view that Roman emperors paid very ...

    Tiberius? generosity has already been mentioned, but Claudius and Vespasian also fall into the same category of compassion and consideration. Claudius is recorded to have sat ?with bags of coins piled before him, recruiting fire-fighters? (Suet. Claudius. 18) on one occasion, demonstrating a true effort to restore order in Rome, following catastrophic events.

  2. To what extent and for what reasons did Augustus resist the creation of an ...

    Clinging to his body is cupid riding a dolphin; as cupid is the sibling of Aenus who founded the Julian line, the direct message that he is involved with the Gods is already being propagated. Equally, the fact that Caesar had been made a deity, established the notion that he was a semi-deity in the minds of many Romans.

  1. Is Aeneas pious, and would the Romans of Augustan Rome have thought him to ...

    Virgil was rumoured to believe that love and hate were both redundant as they were both concept which wavered from the ?path? of fate, creating two opposites that were equally negative to a stoic. This perhaps explains why Virgil shows that the acceptance of fate and your destiny is the only way to achieve rationality.

  2. To what extent did the military reforms of Marius contribute to the collapse ...

    It also gave personal armies a chance to destroy the established order just as easily as it was to maintain it.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work