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Beowulf, the title character of the Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf, is a classic epic hero, a mythological or legendary figure, a brave, self-sacrificing, illustrious warrior and king

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Introduction

Beowulf Beowulf, the title character of the Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf, is a classic epic hero, a mythological or legendary figure, a brave, self-sacrificing, illustrious warrior and king endowed with great strength and ability, admired for his achievements and noble qualities, who represents good and battles evil, who embodies the ideals of his society, who fulfills his quest to rescue those who need help and to protect his people. Beowulf is an outstanding fighter. The story gives examples of his fierce strength and great courage, which can grant him glory and future immortality surrounded by his fame. It is obvious that Beowulf is the quintessential hero. His strength and courage are unparalleled and they are the key traits of Beowulf's heroism. Strength and physical appearance are essential to the Anglo-Saxon warrior. ...read more.

Middle

This quotation shows the importance of courage and fate, which was thought to be unchangeable, seems to favor a hero who has enough courage. Beowulf tells Hrothgar and the Danes that he will kill Grendel, but he says he will do this without his sword, and this shows his courage and honor. Beowulf then speaks inspiringly to the thanes: "I had a fixed purpose when I put to sea. (...) I meant to perform to the uttermost what your people wanted or perish in attempt, in the fiend's clutches. And I shall fulfill that purpose, prove myself with a proud deed or meet my death here in the mead- hall" (1193). When Beowulf speaks these words, he shows his great courage, and displays the proper attitude of the warrior. ...read more.

Conclusion

Because "fate goes ever as fate must ", Beowulf explains his death wishes before going into battle and requests to have any assets delivered to his people. He says: "if the battle takes me, send back this breast- webbing that Weland fashioned and Herthel gave me, to Lord Hygelac" (1189). There was also Beowulf's surety in himself. Even though Beowulf instructed Hrothgar to deal with his corpse if he were to fail in the battle with Grendel, his character made it clear that the battle would be victorious. However, he understands that "whichever one death fells must deem it a just judgment by God" (1189). Beowulf is the prime example of an epic hero. His bravery and strength surpass all mortal men. With his skills and talent, he can overcome all. He is fearless and ready to meet with death. Beowulf is the ultimate epic hero who risks his life countless times for immortal glory and for the good of others. ...read more.

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