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Emily the Criminal Mastermind In the story A Rose for Emily, Emily murders her lover using poison.

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Introduction

An (Andy) T. Le #538 English 123/IV Keitha I. Phares, Ph. D. September 22, 2003 Emily the Criminal Mastermind In the story A Rose for Emily, Emily murders her lover using poison. The readers are led on to think that she kills him because she does not want him to leave her, which is what he intends to do. Her relationship with Homer Barron, her lover, is a normal relationship; nothing indicates that their relationship is in any kind of trouble. Having examined her relationship and characters, Emily can be seen as a master criminal. As opposite as they are of each other, they are attracted to one another. ...read more.

Middle

This shows that she can be sociable. After all, she can get along with the most popular guy in town. She is very calm, cool and collective. After her father dies, some people visit her to offer sympathy, yet she is "dressed as usual with no trace of grief on her face." Even though she has killed Homer, when the people in the town visit her because she doesn't pay her property tax, she speaks to them as though there isn't anything wrong. When she goes to buy the poison to kill Homer, she speaks with certainty that she wants to buy the poison. "I want arsenic," she says. ...read more.

Conclusion

Assuming that he knows, yet he doesn't talk to anyone about it shows that she has control over him. Ruling out that she's suffering from insanity, one can only conclude that she's criminal mastermind. Even though her father is abusive, she is able to have meaningful relationship. Her relationship with Homer shows that she can be sociable. After her father's death, she shows no grief. While having Homer's body in the bedroom upstairs, she attends to her guests as though nothing is wrong. At the same time, she is able to keep the butler from talking to anyone about anything. Planning to kill Homer, she buys the poison without any hesitation even though the druggist asks her many questions. Using the control that she has over the person under her and her environment, she gets away with murder. ...read more.

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