• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

HOW EFFECTIVE A LEADER DO YOU CONSIDER AENEAS TO BE?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Tosin Abdullai HOW EFFECTIVE A LEADER DO YOU CONSIDER AENEAS TO BE? On meeting Aeneas for the first time, he appears to be in a very vulnerable situation as he is the middle of a storm. This is emphasized the phrase, "his limbs grew weak" as it puts forward the fact that Aeneas, despite his power and status is like every other normal human being. My first speculation on whether or not Aeneas is a good leader comes from the use of the word "I". In his first speech he says, "Why could I not have fallen to your right hand and breathed out my life on the plains of Troy". Here, although Aeneas is in suffering with all his men, he is selfishly regretting the option of dying a heroic death in the battle of Troy, as it would lead to him to be a figure of great history. This in my opinion does not qualify Aeneas as a good leader, as his actions can be perceived to be self- centred. Contrary to my first perception of Aeneas, is his sense of dedication. Through this, a positive sign of leadership is presented to us on his arrival "on the coast of Libya". ...read more.

Middle

The language used in this speech reflects Aeneas as a Homeric hero, similar to other great warriors, such as Achilles. "He would wage a great war in Italy and crush the fierce tribes". The use of the word, crush, emphasizes Aeneas' power, might and fearlessness over their enemies. Considering the time in which the poem was written, Aeneas would have been a figure of great gratitude due to the fact that he is the preserver of the Trojan race. One can argue that the wiping out of this so- called "fierce tribes" is disadvantageous on the path of Aeneas' character as it presents him as inconsiderate. This is because he himself has experienced such misfortune of losing a homeland and should therefore not be the person to deprive others of theirs. Aeneas makes his cautious nature in the book 1 which, informs us about his concern for the security of his men and himself. "They burned with longing to clasp the hands of their comrades..., but stayed hidden in their cloak of cloud.' This emphasizes his cleverness, as he is able to withhold his feelings and emotions in case of any danger. In this instance, while Aeneas is hidden in his Venus' fog, he confirms the possibility of any safety and help from Dido by examining "Antheus, Sergestus, brave Cloanthus and the other Trojans", as they have come to "plead their case". ...read more.

Conclusion

Also, once more, we are faced with this selfish thinking of dying a heroic death, not with the intentions of saving the land, but the desire to be remembered in history. Finally, Aeneas unfair treatment and little consideration for the safety and well- being of his wife, Creusa counts as a disadvantage on his path as a good leader, as it makes evident his injustice and biased nature. "Young Iulus can walk by my side and my wife can follow in my footsteps at a distance". This is because he is prepared to treat his father, Anchises and son, Ascanius with more respect and love, probably due to the fact that they have a form of blood linkage or rather, the fact that Creusa is a woman. As expected, Creusa is lost in the escape route is "never seen again". In conclusion, I particularly think that Virgil succeeds in presenting a good leader, as he is able to take responsibilities for all his actions no matter the enormity. This view of mine is exemplified by the fact that Aeneas is able to admit and also tell a true tale of all his mistakes to Dido, bearing in mind that he is trying to win over her sympathy and also the fact that she is going to draw a conclusion on his character based on his past history. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Classics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Classics essays

  1. According to the Res Gestae and Suetonius' Life of Augustus, how effective were Augustus' ...

    In Suetonius, there isn't a given reason why this practice, started by Julius Caesar, was abolished. Possibly, Augustus wanted to keep the proceedings less public to stop people knowing what he was doing in the Senate so that any kind of, possibly secret, information would not spread too fast or quickly from the Senate.

  2. What impression is given of Aeneas as a man and as a leader in ...

    This was a huge mistake because Polyphemus is the son of Poseidon and he prays to his father that Odysseus will never see the shores of Ithaca again which is why his nostos took so long because he had a god against him.

  1. Was Julius Caesar an effective leader?

    As governor of Cisalpine Gaul and Gallia Narbonensis he adopted a strategy of forward defence, falling very much in line with the traditional Republican sentiment that a pre-emptive strike to an enemy that may one day attack was the best policy to adopt.2 He utilised the aggression of the Helvetii

  2. How far was Plato's perception of rhetoric a consistent one?

    Emotion and appetite must remain in the correct balance to allow normally functioning life. Reason must have ultimate control over the system. Therefore, by analogy, Philosopher kings should have power over the people. On the face of it, the picture emerging is a chilling one, similar to the situation in George Orwell's '1984'.

  1. Is it appropriate to describe Virgil Aeneid book four as a tragedy?

    paid long attention by the poet, he draws out their pain as well as their joy for the audience, using the tragic death of the characters to swing the emotions of an audience to and fro, to give a rest between the search of a hero for his destiny and show a level of more personal pain and feeling.

  2. ‘There are tears for suffering’ Aeneid 1.462. Show how Virgil conveys the pathos of ...

    Nisus and Euryalus also had only the briefest of mentions before their monopoly of Chapter 9, which tells the story of their heroic venture into the enemies camp and their doom therein. By bringing in these characters, enriching them by describing their impressive feats of arms and then having their

  1. Whom do you admire more as a leader – Odysseus in the Odyssey or ...

    He also has no alienation from his men, such as Achates, and listens to their words ("there is no danger" A.1.584). Odysseus on the other hand has a difficulty with listening to people. Despite Agamemnon's warning in Book 11 ("make a secret approach" O.11.456), it takes Athene's reminder ("tell not a single person" O.13.308)

  2. Is Aeneas pious, and would the Romans of Augustan Rome have thought him to ...

    all of Rome, past and in Virgilâs present, to âgovern the people of the world in (their) empireâ, which is hugely obvious as propaganda, and in a way, excuses Augustusâ plan for world domination, in the same way that many countries throughout history have excused the invasions of other countries:

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work