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Medea betrayed her father to help Jason capture the Golden Fleece. Doing so was a great sacrifice. She doomed herself to forever being a foreigner at a time in history when being foreign could be a very dangerous thing.

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Introduction

Medea was accepted into Corinthian society when she first showed up. She was treated like any Greek woman. Now that her husband has dumped her, however, she's treated as a foreigner. The Greeks are very suspicious of her because she's a foreigner. Nurse: her [Medea's] home she sacrificed to journey here with a man - oh - who disdains her now. (1) Medea betrayed her father to help Jason capture the Golden Fleece. Doing so was a great sacrifice. She doomed herself to forever being a foreigner at a time in history when being foreign could be a very dangerous thing. Nurse: Yes, now [Medea] knows at a terrible first hand what it is to miss one's native land. (1) Though Medea has lived in Corinth for a while, she is still seen as an outsider. ...read more.

Middle

Medea: I am alone, [...] uprooted from a foreign land. [...] So, please, I ask you [Chorus] this: if I can find a way to pay my husband back - your silence. (31) Here Medea uses her status as a foreigner to appeal to the Chorus. She plays on their sympathies, by emphasizing how isolated she is. It works pretty well, too. Medea manages to convince these Corinthian women to stand idly by while she assassinates their royal family. Jason: So [...] this is not the first time I have seen irrevocable damage done by a barbarous rage. (59) When Jason uses the word "barbarous" he's making a direct reference to the fact that Medea is not Greek. The word comes from the Greek barbaros which simply means foreign. ...read more.

Conclusion

She moves all the "enlightened" Greeks around her as easily as chess pieces. Would a stupid barbarian be able to do this? Medea: Oh, the mistake I made was [...] trusting the word of a man from Greece (137) Medea is showing some prejudice of her own here. She seems to imply that all Greeks are just as untrustworthy as Jason. Medea, like all tragic heroines, is definitely not free from flaws. Jason: At last I understand what I never understood before, when I took you from your foreign home to live in Greece, [...] No woman in the whole of Hellas [Greece] would have dared so much (204) Jason again reveals his Greek prejudice to outsiders with this statement. Of course, it's pretty understandable, since Medea has just slaughtered four people, including her own children. It's probably safe to say that the play didn't go a long way toward changing Athenians' opinions of foreigners. ere ultimately, in Greek eyes, just barbarians. ...read more.

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