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What is the probable truth behind Homer's story of the Trojan War?

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Introduction

3. a. What is the probable truth behind Homer's story of the Trojan War? After initial findings by Frank Calvert in 1863 and 1865, much of Hisarlik was excavated by Heinrich Schliemann between 1870 and 1890. Hisarlik, which means "Place of fortresses", is located near the Dardanelles. Schliemann excavated the site for 20 years until his death in 1890. After his death his assistant, Wilhelm D�rpfeld, continued the excavations. The University of Cincinnati sponsored excavations of the site between 1932-1938. ...read more.

Middle

Schliemann discovered Troy II but after dating the site, it was discovered that it was 1000 years to early. The excavations at Hisarlik revealed nine distinct settlements in all, each built upon the remains of the previous. Troy I is at least 5000 years old. Troy II existed during the early Bronze Age. Schliemann discovered a great treasure among the ruins of this Troy. This led him to believe this was the Troy of Homer, but he was mistaken. ...read more.

Conclusion

Troy VII A was built soon after the destruction of Troy VI and differs little. It was destroyed by fire around 1200 B.C., which agrees with the traditional date for the destruction of Homer's Troy around 1184 B.C. This is the Troy that most believe to be the Troy from the Trojan War. Troy VIII contains remains of Greek villages which date from 1100 B.C. to 100 B.C. Troy IX was a Roman settlement. It lasted until 500 A.D. After all the digging and excavating, it is most probable that the 'real' Troy is that of VII A and is the site that most believe to be the Troy from the Trojan War described in Homer's Iliad. ...read more.

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