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0 How far do you agree "Our Country's Good" is about the redemptive power of the theatre

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Introduction

How far do you agree "Our Country's Good" is about the redemptive power of the theatre At the end of the play the prisoners have shaken of the mind forged manacles imposed on them by society, they finally see themselves as free. This can be highlighted by the way they see their futures at the end of the play, Sideway wants to start up his own theatre company, the others his actors, and Wisehammer wants to become a famous writer. They see themselves having a future at the colony, for they no longer want to escape by boat, as in the last scene Dabby says how she is escaping that night but the others don't want to and then she quickly changes her mind. This contrasts hugely with the start of the play where Wisehammer says, "we'll remember England together," at the start they see themselves as convicts not the colonisers that they come to see themselves as. The theatre essentially reforms them from convicts into citizens of the crown, it has given them a chance to contribute to society instead of annoying it. ...read more.

Middle

The theatre redeems Liz's belief in the justice system, when asked why she didn't say didn't steal food, she replies, "it wouldn't of mattered," yet she asked for Ralph to be told she didn't do it. It is men like Ross which have destroyed her belief in justice for he would take the word of a drunk soldier as evidence, and the fact that she remained silent as evidence that she was guilty. It is Ralph and the theatre that makes her claim her evidence, she was part of something in the theatre and had found family, it had given her hope where there was very little. The theatre has redeemed their humanity, in the outset of the play they were cruel and harsh, some were violent criminals such as Arscott, when Ross asks Sideway to take off his shirt he feels shame in front off Ralph, for Ross says, "I have seen the white of this animal's bones," It is the same for Dabby who is told to get down on all fours and Mary who he hoist up her skirt. ...read more.

Conclusion

Tench's view on the prisoners is that they should be learning practical skills and cannot understand the reformation process that the theatre offers to the prisoners, he is not reformed by the theatre as he is a practical man who sees everything in black or white. Collins' views are unchanged, he believes in fair justice for the prisoners for example Liz, but has little compassion for the prisoners, he sees the play as nothing more than a social experiment, there is no emotion from him when he says how a 82 year old woman hands herself. While not a bad person he isn't redeemed b the theatre. The theatre redeems Phillip's confidence in the colony as it offers a chance of redemption of the convicts, he didn't want a woman hanged as the colony was already very demoralised, and their was a chance of mutiny with the lack of food available that also kept getting stolen. The theatre offered the colony hope which was ensure by Phillip's enthusiasm in the project. ?? ?? ?? ?? Ross Taylor RMG-13-H ...read more.

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