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Alfred Hitchcock Is Commonly Known As 'The Master Of Suspense'. Does He Achieve This In The 'Climbing Frame' Scene In The Film 'The Birds'?

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Introduction

Alfred Hitchcock Is Commonly Known As 'The Master Of Suspense'. Does He Achieve This In The 'Climbing Frame' Scene In The Film 'The Birds'? 'The Birds' is a film made in the 1960's based on the short story 'The Birds' by Daphne Du Maurier. The film was directed by Alfred Hitchcock, a British born director who is known for other tense, suspense filled films such as 'Psycho' and 'Vertigo'. Due to the extensive special effects of the film, it took three years to make. During the film Hitchcock created several suspense filled, tense scenes. Including the 'Climbing Frame' scene. Alfred Hitchcock tries to live up to his title 'The Master Of Suspense' whilst creating scenes like this and the following essay looks at if he achieved this. The film is set in Bodega Bay - a small town by the sea. All the residents of the town a fairly close together and know each other well. The 'Climbing Frame; scene takes place during the middle of the film. So far, the main characters have been introduced including Melanie Daniels - the most central character in the film. ...read more.

Middle

Melanie stands up in horror but doesn't scream - instead she runs towards the school to alert Annie of the presence of the birds. We learn a lot about Melanie in this part of the scene. We see that she was nervous about the bird attack but still showed a state of calm when seeing them. If she was nervous she would have screamed but she kept calm. We learn how she shows her nerves and how she calms them with a cigarette. The sounds and camera shots in this scene are crucial in creating tension and suspense. The sound illustrates things to the audience which are not given by camera. For example, the children's singing and the birds arriving on the climbing frame symbolises to the audience good versus evil and shows how innocence contrasts with maliciousness. The camera shots tell the audience to pay attention to detail with close-ups and show how things have changed with distanced shots. When the camera shots switch subjects the audience are anticipating the next shot to discover what's changed. This creates anticipation which also helps to build the suspense and tension. ...read more.

Conclusion

These questions are transferred through to the audience by the worried and anxious look on the characters faces. In conclusion, I think Alfred Hitchcock has created suspense and tension in an effective manner throughout the whole film and especially the 'Climbing Frame' scene. He does this by using the sound and camera shots in different ways to send thoughts into the audiences mind. He uses the characters feelings and emotions to make the audience feel worried and tense. Hitchcock has used the point of creating birds as creatures which could create so much terror in an effective way. It has a psychological feeling in that birds are common everyday animals and that they could turn against anyone, anywhere. When someone looks up into the sky and sees a bird, they will reminisce about the film and remember the birds as a symbol of terror. Although Hitchcock has created suspense and tension in an effective way. I think modern audiences might react differently to the film. I think this because he uses the sound and camera work to send emotions into the minds of the audiences. But modern day films are created in a different style in which everything is there for the audience to see. Arunan Tharmarajah English Coursework 18/12/2007 Pg1 ...read more.

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