• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Compare the opening sequences of the film "Hannibal" with "Reservoir dogs".

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Compare the opening sequences of the film "Hannibal" with "Reservoir dogs" I have chosen to compare the opening sequence of "Hannibal" with that of the opening of the classic crime thriller "Reservoir Dogs. To accurately make comparisons of the two openings it is essential that I study the sound, the use of colour, camera work, lighting text and mise en scene. Not only stating what is there but also why. This has been achieved by first connotating and dennotating each opening. I watched both openings numerous times, both in class and at home. This made it possible for me to decisively analyse and then compare the two openings. The opening sequence of "Hannibal" begins with a black frame and a sound bridge which consists of a conversation between two people, the voices and content of the conversation are unclear but grab the audiences attention as you need to focus to attempt make out what's going on. There is calming music being played, piano music, very soft as not to take our attention away from the voices but just to create a subdued atmosphere. From the bottom right hand corner of the screen a small box with an image in it approaches at a slow but steady pace. The camera is revolving around the image. The box gradually begins to enlarge and takes over from the black frame. ...read more.

Middle

The shot is so sudden that the audience only just have enough time to be taken aback let alone comprehend the significance, the fact that Hannibal later eats a brain. There use of pigeons are a link to the "silence of the lambs" when Hannibal describes Clarice as a pigeon and comes in handy when Hannibal's face is displayed amongst the pigeons for a few seconds. This technique of suspending time is a method used twice in this scene, the other being when the camera focuses briefly on a man who's appearance is much similar to that of Hannibal, but we are left unsure whether it is him or not. Either way we are again reintroduced to Hannibal as a physical character rather than just a theme. There are many images of flesh, a representation of cannibalism which is a key theme associated with "Hannibal". The shot of the pigs links in with the events later in the film, when the hungry pigs are unleashed to destroy Hannibal. This theme has been carried on from the Hannibal trilogy. Police officers are also used signify the factor of crime and deviance used by both Hannibal and fellow FBI agents of Clarice. The opening scene of "Reservoir Dogs" has a duration of 7 and half minutes which is exceedingly long for an opening. For a good 6 minutes neither the setting, camera angle nor characters change within the first scene. ...read more.

Conclusion

The appearances of the characters are key to both stories. In Hannibal Cardels appearance is the instigator of what shall happen in terms of the revenge in which he hopes for and so nearly gets. In RD their appearance is to make the audience aware that they are violent gangsters prepared to do a "job". There is a large amount of mise en scene which the audience are witness to. In Hannibal we see the mask and the colours blue and red are of great importance. In RD it is their costumes and mannerisms that play a significant role in helping the audience establish who they are, and that is gangsters. As both films cut to the second scene of their openings, this is where the major comparisons begin. Hannibal uses a vast range of quick relevant images. With the camera work coming in the form of a security camera, and with security or the lack of it from Hannibal being a key theme. In RD the pace from the first scene continues and we are just shown some more characteristics of the gangsters. Camera work is more of an issue in Hannibal, with a diverse range of movement from the panning round in the conversation to the quick shots in Italy, RD concentrates more on the simplicity of one camera constantly circling round as to capture the atmosphere amongst the breakfast morning meeting. By Joe Williams ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Plays section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Plays essays

  1. How do Peter Benchley and Steven Spielberg build up tension and suspense in the ...

    The reader later learns that there is a 'stream of blood flushing from the woman's femoral artery' signifying that the fish has bitten through her main artery. This shows the precise accuracy that the fish has when attacking its prey and reminds the reader how powerful the fish is.

  2. Language of Performing Arts

    Timing ourselves was useful in all three art forms because it allowed us to keep to the time limit and remove any unnecessary parts from each piece. Each of the four three minute pieces were matinee performances, performed to my peer group; AS performance studies students.

  1. Evaluating The Silence Of The Lambs.

    The police invade the wrong house while Clarice Starling invades the correct one but she is unaware of his true identity as she thinks she is just following up an enquiry. The mysterious character invites her in and Clarice realises there is something wrong and points her gun at him.

  2. Explore and Compare the constraints of socitey in madame bovary

    Each song in the musical had also been cleverly composed for that particular act and as the whole play is sung each lyric is carefully chosen to make what Les Mis(rables is today. Adding to the spatial, visual and aural elements of the production were also the special effects making

  1. What part does the mise en scene play in the introduction of the character ...

    never have thought off him as when he was in the jungle. We know he is a teacher as he is writing on a black board and there is people sat behind desks listening to him. In this scene the lighting is much more bright which makes the audience see

  2. Comparison of the opening sequences of two different versions of 'Romeo & Juilet' - ...

    Words (The prologue) then flash quickly on the screen. This builds up the audience's adrenaline and suggests to them what the film is going to be like. Then the first scene commences. The first scene shows the Montague boys. They are here portrayed as being the more light-hearted gang - A bright yellow car, loud music, and pink hair.

  1. In the light of your study of Stanislavski and after seeing Miss Julie how ...

    has resulted in Masha not getting over the death, just replaying it repeatedly in her mind, effectively making her unable to think of anything else and become further withdrawn. She rarely speaks, and because of this, the sisters cannot help her.

  2. Analyze the opening sequences of David Lean and Alfonso Cuaron's film version of 'Great ...

    to know what the film actually contains, whether it is horror or drama. David Lean and Alfonso Cuaron are using the different techniques to keep the audience interested in the movie. The soundtrack of both versions is different because Alfonso Cuaron has played music throughout his opening frames.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work