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Edward Gordon Craig revolutionised 20th Century theatre with his 19th Century ideas

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Introduction

Drama Half-Term essay/ Discuss Craig's vision of an ideal theatre including - * Total theatre * The role of the director * The performer (uber marionette) * The staging (kinetic theatre) * Movement Edward Gordon Craig revolutionised 20th Century theatre with his 19th Century ideas. Craig saw the need to break naturalistic conventions - move away from a text based theatre and develop an art where all elements of drama worked in harmony and sought to create a theatre based on sound, lighting and movement coming together to form a unified stage picture. Craig had always been surrounded by Victorian theatre, all of which included realistic sets - and therefore imitated the real world. But Craig believed that theatre should contrast with the reality of the real world, making it a whole new and exciting experience to the audience. It was through this that Craig put forward a belief of a unified stage picture. ...read more.

Middle

The use of masks and robes would cover the actor's face and body, therefore "suppression of egoism" was achieved. This would allow the actor to perform role without the interaction of audience. Craig wished the Ubermarionette to offer his intelligence and imagination to a production rather than his passion, but many people criticised Craig's views, believing that he wished actors to just become mere puppets. With this change to theatre Craig strongly believed that the director, producer, and designer should be as one, and that the role of this person was to dictate all aspects of the production, (including the acting) to ensure complete unity. He believed that the director should have total artistic control and that often the play should be left open to his/her interpretation, with the playwright having to work with only his ideas. With this Craig began to look at stage space in the way an architect might design a building. ...read more.

Conclusion

Light would play across these surfaces and change with the mood. The difficulty in this was the technology available to him, which led Craig to experiment with portable, movable screens: canvas flats which could be moved around and arranged in different configurations and lit in any colour according to mood. It was this idea which was used in staging Hamlet but he continued to experiment with this idea throughout his life in order to create a setting that by invisible means could move in ways analogous to the actor and to light. As for movement, Craig regularly preferred jesters that had no curves in them. For example the arms to be held out straight up, forward, or out sideways. He liked kneeling in which the body was bent into a sharp angle, and believed that by creating his own rules and logic (all within strict limit's) the audience would be held from wondering or loosing themselves by the square lines and shapes... ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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