• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Fear and Misery in the Third Reich play review

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Amy Nickell Question 8 - Fear and Misery in the Third Reich On the 6th October 2005 I went to see a production of 'Fear and Misery in the Third Reich' by Bertiot Brecht at the Markova Theatre. The production was performed by the Watford Palace travelling theatre company. During the performance once performance really did surprise me. It was the performance of the 'Jewish Woman'performed by Sarah Stanley. The reason I found this a very surprising performance was that I was incredibly moved by her performance. I left the play thinking very deeply about the message she conveyed. I also felt extremely emotional during that particular section. This surprised me as up until that point I had not felt any emotion for any of the characters in the play. ...read more.

Middle

Her body language completely changed and transformed her into the 'Jewish Woman'. She walked extremely poised and upright. She had a slow controlled pace - this was very effective as she controlled the stage and engaged the audience's attention. She led with her chest and held her head high. She had an extremely proud posture. She stuck her nose in the air and came across almost snobby. I found this surprising as the woman knew why she was packing yet Sarah Stanley decided to perform the woman as fearless and too proud to show emotion. She used gestus amazingly and I immediately got an impression of the class she was. She used her voice to enhance the type of character also. She used stereotypical 'posh' accent. ...read more.

Conclusion

Throughout the play the actors wore a constant costume of a prisoner uniform - with a symbol on it to determine what kind of prisoner they were (eg - the Jews would have a star of David). During different scenes the actors would put on one thing to show there character change - like the jewish woman had a pair of high heels and a set of beads. I think having the Jewish Woman packing her bags in such a proud manner, showing no signs if fear or misery to start with, in the prisoner outfit was very effective as it almost showed what the future held for this woman. I found this a very harrowing image. I thought that Sarah Stanley performed the character of the Jewish Woman extremely convincingly - yet very surprisingly and different to how I imagined she would. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Plays section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Plays essays

  1. A theatre review of Les Miserables.

    This was an unusual performance because it made you feel sorry for the bad guy (Valjean) and made you hate the good guy (Jevert). The performance kept my attention at all times.

  2. 'At the Inland Sea' a play written by Edward Bond - review

    This is not only because they are horrid sounds its also because you are helpless towards helping them. The relief of the sound leaving is over and they return - this emphasising the discomfort of the audience. The womans last words are being dragged effortlessly out in the background stage directions indicate 'choking' you hear her call 'too late'.

  1. The Caucasian Chalk Circle - Bertolt Brecht Ayla Schafer

    He only moved when it was necessary, making him very simple and interesting to watch but never boring. He gave the impression of being very tranquil and thoughtful because of this stillness and this was one of the clear characteristics that Stephen Povey gave Simon.

  2. The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui Visual, Aural and Spatial Visual: ...

    In order to utilise Brecht's 'A' effect, or 'alienation' effect, the actors must confidently grasp and understand his spatial techniques. We carried out various practical exercises in order to understand and be able to discuss these spatial techniques and what effect the physical interaction between the characters would have on the audience.

  1. The stimulus we were given to look at was the play 'Too Much Punch ...

    This was effective as it represented the public's view on the crash: shocked, surprised and upset. We also used a tableau when Jo was throwing Judy the keys. A tableau is a still image that symbolizes or represents something. This was significant as it is the beginning of the end;

  2. The Woman in Black Review

    Recorded sound was also used in this play. In the same way as lighting it set the scene and emulated a climax. For instance it was used to create a scene in an office by the ticking of a clock.

  1. Personal performance review

    Before starting anything we sat down as a group and discussed which themes we would like to incorporate into our play. The ones we came up with were : * Power * Loneliness * Injustice * Family honour/loyalty * Nature * Desperation * Betrayal * Marriage - family values Following

  2. Evaluate Brian Clark's play "Whose Life Is It Anyway?"

    In Act 1, tension reaches the highest point in the scene, when Ken refuses to take Valium. This scene demonstrates how arrogant the medical profession can be because of ignoring the will of the patients and describes Ken's crude, yet understandable reaction at the treatment he receives.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work