• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Having Watched Gus Van Sant's Remake of Alfred Hitchcock's Film Psycho Analyse How Van Sant makes the Shower Scene Effective.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Having Watched Gus Van Sant's Remake of Alfred Hitchcock's Film Psycho Analyse How Van Sant makes the Shower Scene Effective. When asked what they remember from the original Psycho, most people would say that the shower scene was the part of the film that they remembered most. In this essay I will be analysing this famous scene but from the remake directed by Gus Van Sant. The remake of the film, created in the nineteen ninety's, has many differences from the sixties version. This is advantageous to the production. Examples of this are the use of colour and modern camera techniques that can be used to create tension, fear, anxiety, and psychological horror. A result of the use of modern camera techniques is that the director can diversify the camera shots which allows the audience to seemingly see through Marian Crane's eyes and allows the audience to seemingly see through the eyes of an unseen voyeur. This diversity, which is used throughout the film, creates atmospheres of tension and at parts makes the viewer feel intrusive; this is achieved as a part of the modern usage of the cameras was that they could show intimacy within the shots. Gus Van Sant directs the cameras in was to create certain effects. He does this throughout the film to make the audience nervous and in the shower scene he uses the cameras to maximum effect to make the audience feel extremely uncomfortable, involved with the character, intrusive and at points terrified. ...read more.

Middle

From the point Marian turns the shower on, the camera keeps changing shots from the shower head down to the naked body and seemingly from Marian up to the shower head. These shots alternate and the individual shots last for a shorter and shorter period of time which creates tension and suspense. After a few seconds of this the viewer sees a shot of the translucent shower curtain and this gives the viewer the advantage of visual irony over Marian because they see a dark figure in the room. This advantage makes the suspense grow and tension mount as our relationship gained throughout the film with Marian has involved the viewer with her and so our concern is greater than if we had no relationship at all. The figure eventually reaches the curtain and aggressively pulls it back and at this moment Van Sant uses the camera to portray an image of horror and desperate need as he shows a close up of Marian's face which reflects a mood of terror. Following their shock at what has just happened the viewer becomes more terrified as the dark figure begins to continually stab Marian in her most vulnerable state. A motif is created within the scene at this point as the viewer has seen contrast occur, both with the bright bathroom against the dark hotel room and also the dark figure contrasted against the bright bathroom. The motif continues in the scene with the contrast of the dark knife against the white of Marian's skin. ...read more.

Conclusion

Throughout the film Gus Van Sant has made the shower scene effective by using a range of camera shots. These include long pan shots, short quick shots or long close ups to create many moods and atmospheres which can make what is happening visually seem more real and dramatic. As well as good camera techniques Van Sant has made the scene effective by linking frames with appropriate sounds such as ambient sounds like the rain with resulted in brilliant effect. Also a solitary mood was created as well as an anxious and horrific atmosphere by orchestral sounds which had equal effect but they illustrated frenzied panic. An amazing composition with good harmony between sounds and images has really made this scene effective which is why the scene is so widely known. While writing this essay I had the benefit of seeing the whole film. If this section of the film was seen in isolation I believe that certain motifs wouldn't have been so apparent. An example of this is that the audience would not have been as comfortable with the scene if they had viewed it in isolation as they would not have seen the parts of the film that contained sexual images. It would have been the first time that the viewer would have seen the intense and indeed intrusive camera shots; whereas when the scene is viewed in context with the rest of the film the camera shots are not new. All these reasons I believe add to the scenes excellence whether seen in or out of context with the rest of the film. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Plays section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Plays essays

  1. How does Alfred Hitchcock gain the sympathy of the audience for Marian Crane in ...

    Music played a big part in the film. Bernard Herrman came up with an idea that strings would represent the sounds of stabbing actions of the knife. Marian Crane is the main character at the beginning of 'Psycho'. The audience is on her side until she gets killed off.

  2. How does Alfred Hitchcock create anxiety in the shower scene from Psycho

    In this essay I will mostly focus on the shower scene and will be analysing; ? Mise en scene ? Sound ? Camera ? Editing Mise en scene is what is put on the screen and why it is put there.

  1. Analyse the opening of the horror film 'Scream'

    The tension builds when she is talking to the killer the camera focuses on the popcorn for a second and it's getting louder. The camera then takes you closer and closer to her body. The camera looks out of the window into the patio and you can see a reflection of her face looking scared.

  2. "In 'Psycho' how has Alfred Hitchcock created tension throughout the film and what effect ...

    This adds tension for we are worried that Marion is going to give herself away. She acts suspiciously when saying 'why do you want my license'. The camera then films a privilege shot, so we can see everything that the officer cannot, Marion hiding the stolen money.

  1. Log of Film production.

    Who is this man? Why is he running? Etc. The audience are forced into thinking for themselves. By allowing the audience to think about the situation, the piece becomes a lot more open ended and allows people to become more intrigued.

  2. In what ways is "Psycho" (Alfred Hitchcock) a film for the modern audience? ...

    Unlike these directors, Hitchcock actually had to work incredibly hard to make his masterpiece look as realistic as possible and had to depend on illusions. A perfect example of this is the famous shower scene, where we are pretty sure that Marion is getting stabbed, but we don't actually see the knife puncturing the skin or any wounds.

  1. In a 1963 interview, following the phenomenal success of "Psycho" Hitchcock agreed with his ...

    Whether single names, or blocks of names, they shoot in, abruptly stop, and dart off. The action of these names could easily be portrayed as some sort of chase, implying that this is what the film is all about and that it has already started.

  2. The following essay will reveal to you three production techniques from the basement scene ...

    Not only does it show the expression of the women, it also reveals the mystery behind the basement. This adds to the tension and also builds up the climax of the scene. Lighting plays an important role in any film.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work