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How the group planned for a range of responses from the audience.

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Introduction

How the group planned for a range of responses from the audience. It has always been the group's intentions to show both sides of drugs, both the positive and negative effects of taking certain drugs and differences between them. We were also eager to explain this in a way which is not 'preaching' to our audience or telling them what or what not to do. Our piece was aimed at older children, mid-to-late teens, as we felt that these are the people, who are more aware of what is going on in the world, and the topic of drugs is very relevant - however the current methods of drug education are quite one-dimensional. We knew this having just experienced the education first hand. All educational films and products all show drugs in an extremely negative light. We wanted to show both sides, and show that drugs do have positive effects - or at least, be better than other 'alternatives'. ...read more.

Middle

This was the effect we had planned in order make the audience see through the eyes of a user. They also indicated that their favourite scene was the, as they put it, "Pizza and Bong" scene. Even though it was good to receive praise for a scene, from the descriptions as to why they liked the scene it was obvious to us that the scene was possibly aimed a little too much towards them, and may not be appreciated by an older audience. The language used lacked a little maturity, and the audience only seemed to remember the scene for the words "Pizza" and "Bong" rather than the contrast between alcohol, weed and the question: "Is alcohol better than weed?" There were several responses from the audience that we expected to receive. Whilst we were eager to keep a serious tone to the piece it was important to keep some comedy within the production. ...read more.

Conclusion

The actors not involved in the scene will sit in the audience and ask questions, if the actual audience are unwilling to. We also realise that some questions may be hard to respond to, and we combated this problem by giving Gerald an on-stage 'PR'. This would allow for controlled conferring to get an answer that is suitable. The 'PR' could also have notes on the subject with facts and figures - should a question be asked that requires these. Part of the idea of the production is to change the way the audience look at and perceive drugs, the use of drugs, and the users. We decided that in order to do this the audience should experience drugs from both sides...from the outside looking in, and experiencing within the 'trips' as if they were a part of it. The 'trips' are also not defined as trips, until after they have occurred; this will make the audience wonder what is 'real', and what is a 'trip'? This is similar to what a user would experience - a blurred line between reality and illusion. ...read more.

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