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In Waiting for Godot Beckett turns the undramatic (waiting, doubt, perpetual uncertainty) into tense action - Discuss with reference to two particular moments.

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Introduction

In Waiting for Godot Beckett turns the undramatic (waiting, doubt, perpetual uncertainty) into tense action. Discuss with reference to two particular moments. In Waiting for Godot the constant waiting creates a background for the different events that occur in the play, these events in turn highlight this waiting with the doubt and perpetual uncertainty that the characters Estragon and Vladimir feel. Beckett's use of language is one of the main factors in creating dramatic tension throughout the play, as can be seen in Act 1 when Vladimir and Estragon talk of waiting for godot and their uncertainty that they are at the right place. In this moment the characters' conversation rambles on and they seem to go off at a tangent; Vladimir: "He said by the tree.

Middle

Estragon: "He should be here...") gives a lighter side to their almost unbearable suffering. This injection of tension and humour by Beckett turns this undramatic, almost inane conversation into an interesting, attention grabbing piece of writing, as it keeps the monotony of the play amusing an audience. Nearing the end of Act 1, when Pozzo and Lucky are departing from Estragon and Vladimir's company, another moment can be highlighted as showing Beckett's skill of turning the undramatic into action. There is constant repetition in this moment, as is throughout the play, with all three characters (excluding Lucky) say "Adieu" at least twice, then continue to use regulatory language to continue the farewell even further.

Conclusion

The way the two characters talk about time borders on depressive, with the fact that 'it' would have passed in any case showing their constant waiting and doubts. In many cases it is true to say Beckett turns the undramatic into tense action. By his double entendres and linguistic techniques he shows the hidden depths in the play that make it a lot more symbolic than just two people waiting by a tree. Even when breaking Grice's maxim of quality, the audience are still captivated by both the comic and tragic elements of the two characters' situation, showing Beckett's ability to keep an audience's attention high.

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