• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

"Independent Film Industries Reinforce The Global Construction Of The Hybrid Genre" Discuss

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

David Stevens "Independent Film Industries Reinforce The Global Construction Of The Hybrid Genre" Discuss Almost every country has its own film industry. Films are being produced across the world, from the low budget gangster films of Britain's "Lock Stock and Two Smoking Barrels" and Australia's "Chopper" to the French 'art cinema' of "L'aventura" and the German action offering of "Run Lola Run". This is of course to exclude America. Hollywood is the center of the global film industry and it can be considered impossible to gain international superstardom without passing through its coiffured gates. What is it that separates Hollywood from the rest of the world? Is Hollywood the culmination of international filmic development? Has Hollywood incorporated the popular conventions of independent cinema into its mainstream as it did with the flourish of auteurs in the 60's and 70's? To answer these questions one must first consider the definition of Hollywood and Independent cinema. Pam Cook1 has defined international film industries simply as the "absence of Hollywood", this though is harsh, as cinema existed before the globalisation of Hollywood, the 'age d'or' of France in the 1920's for example. So to analyse the relationship between Hollywood and the rest of the world a definition of the differing industries must be articulated, whether it be of industrial or generic conventions. Furthermore, the role of the audience in this definition must be questioned and whether a film's origin of production actually makes a difference in the way it is consumed. Differences in films from different countries could lie in the differences in genre and its definition, even audience consumption. Each country changes conventions of particular genres to their own social climate. This Saussurian2 idea, that meaning of one thing can change by its surrounding text, can be identified within the Romantic Comedy genre. In British 'RomComs' such as "Jack and Sarah" a grainy filter is used on the camera to add a gritty realism and lead characters are often faulted and possibly not as beautiful ...read more.

Middle

This again leads to the question of the genre's popularity and a possible answer is that the gangster film had proven to be the playground for groundbreaking directors. Within independent cinema, without the narrative constraints of industry pressure, young directors have had the chance to break boundaries. Guy Ritchie's success with "Lock Stock and Two Smoking Barrels" has lead to populist imitations such as "Gangster No1" whilst "Chopper's" director Andrew Dominik created massive uproar in Australia over his sinister character study. Even within Hollywood much innovation has appeared through this genre, as the 'brat pack' of director/auteurs changed the genre single-handedly. Francis Ford Coppola created the modern gangster film with "The Godfather" whilst Martin Scorsese explored it through "Goodfellas". This popularity through directorial innovation conjures up an idea of the gratifications model as the audience searches for, as Renoir16 put it, "esoteric structure" throughout the genre. Yet again, though, industry demands must be considered as Scorsese's later works such as "Casino" could be seen as studio demands from Universal for a repeat of his success, equally so could Coppolla's return to "The Godfather" in 1990 funded by Paramount. Therefore, the auteur can be seen as becoming diluted and formulaic, only supplying a global industry and therefore aiding the construction of the hybrid genre. Going back to simple ideas of narrative could also help explain this popularity, as Propp's17 characters can be seen, for example in "Donnie Brasco", Depp is the hero, Pachino the helper, Heche the prize and Madson the Villain. Similarly in the German "Run Lola Run", Lola is the heroine, Manni the prize and Ronnie the villain. Another prevailing narrative similarity is that of Todorov's18 equilibrium, for example "Casino" starts with Sam having a bookkeeper's job, the chaos ensues with his attempt at running a casino, then equilibrium returns once more as he again becomes a bookkeeper. This all points to the same conclusion, that despite independent innovation, globalisation has lead to the unification of the gangster genre, a pattern repeated across film and epitomised with the tentpole blockbuster, such as the kung foo/western/action hybrid "Shanghai Noon". ...read more.

Conclusion

Differences in production caused by budget are becoming less severe as independent producers receive Hollywood backing. Narrative comparisons can be made as well as links in location of filming be seen. By catering to the new global audience, independent cinema actually adds to the knowledge that can be drawn upon by mainstream directors in their manipulation of codes and conventions. This is how independent cinema paradoxically perpetuates global generic hybridity and therefore mainstream cinema. 1 Taken from "The Cinema Book", Pam Cook, published by BFI 2 Taken from "The Media Students Books", Routledge, 1996 3 Taken from "Advanced Studies in Media", Nelson, 1998 4 Taken from "Approaches To Popular Film", Manchester University, 1995 5 Taken from "The Media Students Book", Routledge, 1996 6 Taken from "Approaches to Popular Film", Manchester University, 1995 7 Taken from "Studying the Media", Arnold, 1994 8 Taken from "Approaches to Popular Film", Manchester University, 1995 9 Taken from "Sociology in Action", Harra Lambosse and Holborne 10 Taken from "Approaches to Popular Film", Manchester University, 1995 11 Taken from "The Media Students Handbook". Routledge, 1996 12 Taken from "Approaches to Popular Film", Manchester University, 1995 13 Stuart Hall, www.aber.ac.uk/media/students 14 Mulvey and considerations of psychoanalytical feminist theory, taken from "Approaches to Popular Film", Manchester University, 1995 15 Taken from "Approaches to Popular Film", Manchester University, 1995 16 Taken from "The Cinema Book", Pam Cook, BFI 17 Taken from "The Media Students Handbook", Routledge, 1996 18 Taken from "The Media Students Handbook", Routledge, 1996 19 Taken from "The Media Students Handbook", Routledge, 1996 20 Examples of these characteristics being; downbeat and gritty for Warner's and glamorous and glossy for MGM. 21 Information taken from "The Daily Mirror" 22 Taken from "Approaches to Popular Film", Manchester University, 1995 23 John Woo was recognised for his successes in Hong Kong cinema with films such as "Hard Boiled" he was then recruited to Hollywood, directing, among others, "Face/Off" and Mission Impossible: Two". 24 Taken from "Sociology in Action", Harra Lambosse and Holborne 25 Taken from "Approaches to Popular Film", Manchester University, 1995 26 Taken from "Approaches to Popular Film", Manchester University, 1995 VI ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Plays section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Plays essays

  1. How do the codes and conventions of a genre make Trainspotting a success?

    a boost when they see that you can if you try, as Mark has shown us. The codes and conventions in Trainspotting make the film a success as people are able to either relate to what is happening or they are more aware of what drugs can do to you.

  2. In this essay I will be analysing in depth four scenes from Baz Luhrmann's ...

    The tango is a slow and passionate South American Ballroom dance. The movements of the dancers represent the emotions of the dance on one hand they are passionate and on the other hand they are violent as the grabbing of her arms suggests.

  1. Explore and Compare the constraints of socitey in madame bovary

    the atmosphere that compliments the period of the 19th century furthermore diegetic sound effects are used, for example the sounds of scurrying rats in the sewers this in turn enables the performance to become more pragmatic and effective when being performed to the audience.

  2. Classical Othello vs Mordern Othello

    The music and special effects that were used in the classic was very limited and was only used to build tension when there was a fight scene and to show triumph and celebration after a fight but very rarely you would hear any music or see much special effect during the whole piece.

  1. What do we learn about New York and the programmes themselves through the openings ...

    A very optimistic atmosphere is created by doing this, by showing the future, and consequently a new day and fresh start. The effect is also that an especially stereotypical feminine environment is displayed, making Carrie seem additionally at home in the city.

  2. Media Analyisis - Big Brother

    The other less major enigma codes, such as romances and the "tasks" ensure that the audience's interest is held at all times. The bright, synthetic lighting of the Big Brother house creates a claustrophobic environment, this again encourages conflict. An important point to consider when analysing Big Brother is the

  1. identifying codes and conventions of two different documentaries

    As the documentary goes on, we see that the boys separate into two different groups- the loud boys and the quieter boys. Conflict develops between the groups, and the boys start to display hostile and aggressive behaviour towards each other.

  2. The original stimulus to our original ideas was the way in which children of ...

    This ranged from feelings of being an outsider to verbal and even physical attacks. We decided to incorporate a physical attack and its consequences into our piece to illuminate the full effect of racism. We displayed such aggression as a shock tatic with the view to heightening the emotions experienced by the audience.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work