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Out line your present understanding of Stanislavski's system

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Introduction

Laura Hall Out line your present understanding of Stanislavski's system Konstantin Sergeivich Stanislavski was born in 1863 and dies in 1938. He was a Russian actor, director and acting trainer. In 1898 together with Nemirovich- Danchenko, he founded the Moscow Art Theatre. Stanislavski believed that theatre was about working together, he recognized the need to improve the theatre practice of his time and saw actors needed methods to help them act well and consistently. To solve these problems he developed what was later to be called The System. It was a rational process of techniques and exercises designed to train and develop the actor's skills. The areas Stanislavski believed were important to concentrate on included imagination, observation, creativity, physical and vocal skills and intellectual analysis. This system was perfected after thirty years of careful research, analysis and practical application. The main system was divided into two main areas. The first concerned the physical state of the actor, Stanislavski thought that the body was the actors instrument and just like a musicians instrument it needed attention and 'tuning'. Therefor the believed actors should be in good physical shape and have many physical skills. The second part was called the Psycho-technique and was concerned with the actor's mental state. ...read more.

Middle

Thus it becomes possible for the performer to work from outer expression to inner feeling. Subtext, Stanislavski uses this term for the meaning and emotional power that lie beneath the lines , the 'unspoken' content of characters' thoughts, actions, attitudes and relationships. In probing and expressing the subtext, actors create a more dynamic and life like interpretation and performance of the text. The through line of action, This device is based on Stanislavski's idea that each actor should discover and utilise her/his character's main motive for action whatever it is that drives them through the play. I have used this device in helping me to understand a character from A play by Anton Chekhov called 'The Three Sisters', stanislavski was well known for directing Chekhov's plays including this one. I had chosen to work on the character of Andrey. The through line of action can be summed up in one sentence starting with 'I want....'. Firstly I considered how Andrey's character behaves during the play and what his main objectives are. I eventually came up with the sentence which I think works for a through line of action of his character. 'I want my sisters to understand me and respect my decisions'. ...read more.

Conclusion

Thus, if an actor is called upon to portray some experience they have not actually had, an analogous feeling could usefully be recalled and used. Stanislavski remained aware that for an actor to draw on a very painful personal experience may not be good for that individual or control of the emotion aroused might prove difficult. An alternative was to use improvisation: a freely created dramatic scene can generate powerful emotions that can also be recalled later and channeled into the text. The unbroken line of life. Stanislavski stresses that actors should not only maintain concentration and remain in role when onstage but offstage, too. Furthermore, events that take place offstage during the play even simply elapses of time must also be taken into account and drawn into the portrayal of characters. So offstage experiences are made physically and emotionally apparent to the audience, if appropriate, and at each entrance/re-entrance onto the stage the actor brings with them the offstage experience. This led Stanislavski to encourage his actors to improvise scenes and events that were referred to in the play or were a crucial part of the development of the text. These creations around the play aided the creation of this continuous 'life' of a character, which in turn contributes to the subtext of the whole performance. By using these 10 techniques Stanislavski intended to introduce an almost scientific, methodical approach to acting. ...read more.

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