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AS and A Level: Plays

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  • Peer Reviewed essays 2
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  5. 46
  1. Free essay

    Berkoff's Theatrical Purpose

    5 star(s)

    in the Fall of the House of Usher the sense of the 'House' is created before the audience enter by using a sound-scape and not through a set as Berkoff focuses more on the actor. Also Berkoff's idea of 'Total Theatre' aims to challenge the audience using all the aspects offered by the theatre including athletic actors. He used this style to make the audience more than just on-lookers of the performance and to bring the text to life, rather than just to portray what is written.

    • Length: 448 words
  2. Peer reviewed

    Blood Brothers evaluation.

    3 star(s)

    It had a rich and luxurious feeling to it and the audience must have felt the same way too, especially with the binoculars built into the seats. The cyclorama (hanging cloth/sky cloth) had a big affect on the audience because it created an illusion of stars and night, which is not commonly used on most stages so it was particularly impressive. The thing that makes or can make musicals in this genre more attractive are props because they add colour, they make it more realistic, added connotations and helps you to tell what is happening by symbolic representation.

    • Length: 625 words
  3. Free essay

    Performance notes on our piece - John Godbers Teechers

    Salty would need to be more naturalistic as he would exaggerate some aspects of the characters he plays in the 'play within the play'. We all played the parts of directors throughout rehearsals, one of the problems I faced was trying to tell my 2 other members what I think they should do at certain parts of the play. I found this a problem as it was hard to get across an idea I had in my head of what I pictured how I would play the part.

    • Length: 1901 words
  4. Three sister Anton Chekov analysis and review of a performance.

    The lights and haze were ominous suggesting about what was going to happen. You could piece together that Solyony was going to kill the baron. There was a sense of impending doom. Hope and despair is communicated in many different ways between different characters. Masha and her husband show hope and despair, Masha wants so desperately to be free and be with the major and Kruglin wants Masha to love him. A good example of this is in act 4 when Masha says good bye to the major.

    • Length: 1032 words
  5. Evaluation of Our Performance - Twelfth Night

    We used very simple lighting which gave a general wash of colour a too much eccentric lighting would have modernised and taken the attention of the play. The lighting was also used when we had scene changes and due to not having to move around props the scene changes were quick and easy. It was much easier as keep intact where the audience were sitting and could easily signal Shaquille when we were ready as he was behind the audience watching us.

    • Length: 568 words
  6. Free essay

    The directors of Lovesong wanted to convey the obstacles that a couple go through to show that love endures. The characters were put through many tests to in their relationship but they stayed strong.

    Sound in the performance was a way that the directors sent out a subtext, an example is throughout the play a flock of birds would be projected on the back wall and you would hear them. This represented the couple, because Margaret and William are each individuals but they are together like a flock and stronger together. The sounds of birds flying by could also represented time and that time is running out. Another effective way that sound was used when the couple was arguing and children was singing happy birthday was heard in the background .This was effective because

    • Length: 936 words
  7. Free essay

    Drama review. On the 6.11.11 we attended a performance, which is based on the book the metamorphosis by Kafka.

    As the sounds of thunder appeared it made it obvious that it was part of the act and that the first scene is a rainy day. The stage set up was very crammed together, which gave the impression that the director was trying to create crust phobia in the play. There were two doors which did not have the physical appearance of a typical door, instead it was an outline of a door so I and the audience could see through it, the 'doors' were placed parallel to each other, and behind the door at the centre was a white

    • Length: 849 words
  8. Notes on our devised piece. I felt that our piece was particularly eerie for the audience due to the fact that we made sure none of our characters were ever off stage. Even if they werent part a scene we would have them standing at the corner of t

    However, I felt that to merely imply was a more successful tactic in making the audience uncomfortable since they weren't sure what to believe, and were left questioning whether their imagination went too far. However, I still believe that our piece was successful in meeting the criteria of a Creative Adaptation, and also in keeping to our dramatic intentions to create an eerie atmosphere and to make the audience feel uncomfortable. Our physical theatrical techniques used were greatly praised when we performed to our peers, who gave us feedback which was so positive towards our stylised movements that we felt it was a good idea to repeat this dance throughout the piece, and show a breakdown of the characters' emotions.

    • Length: 817 words
  9. The Crucible by Arthur Miller - Use of Language

    almost three centuries before it was written, and was ostensibly about the mass hysteria of the witchhunts, was in reality a thinly veiled portrayal of his contemporaries in 1950s America, and the mass hysteria generated by McCarthyism, and the white house committees' ridiculous charades. Miller's style in this play is very simple, although at times he uses somewhat poetic dialogue (reflecting the idiom of the era in which it is set), such as John Proctor's prosaic verbal impugning of Danforth during the trial in which he delivers an acerbic and ireful speech in court: "For them that quail to bring

    • Length: 770 words
  10. The Crucible by Arthur Miller - Form and Structure

    There is also the idea of honor and truth. Proctor tries to keep his reputation but gives it up to reveal the truth. Through his struggle he achieves righteousness. All these things keep the plot moving. Proctor's relationship with Elizabeth can be seen to grow and mature. He continually grows more pure in Elizabeth's sight until she is able to forgive him in act four. Proctor character also attains a kind of moral supermeminence - He does not want to get involved in the court proceedings in act two but stands up for the truth in act four, and this

    • Length: 949 words
  11. Glass Menagerie

    This play was set during the time period of 1900s, which meant that it was difficult to support a family at that time. Especially with the other members of the family not working. Not only was Tom's sister handicap and completely helpless but his nagging mother didn't help at all either. Tom had the responsibly of paying the bills and providing the food for his family. And although his mother did want to work, she was in no position to get a job, especially being and an older female at that time with no work experience.

    • Length: 582 words
  12. Beautiful Burnout by frantic assembly: REVIEW

    from him when during a championship game he is injured and disabled for life, showing that his abilities an love of the game when put into perspective weren't worth it due to the loss of his normal everyday abilities, this proves boxing to be a controversial sport. The play was indeed gripping, due to its controversy, mainly because boxing in the past and present day is one of the most dangerous sports ever to be conceived by our society. It creates many disputable topics and arguments in today's world.

    • Length: 1024 words
  13. The birthday party analysis

    Goldberg's soft heartedness is, however, pure sham. His outward charm and polite manner mask a sadistic nature. This cruelty is first revealed in his initial interrogation of Stanley. It is this disagreement between Goldberg's calm appearance and his vicious interior that makes him the more sinister of Pinter's two persecutors. Stanley- Religious Jewish man. Persuasive, powerful, - the knowing of his whole life and past but little about why he's here. Nostalgic. Nat Goldberg, in his fifties, is the older of the two strangers who come to interrogate and intimidate Stanley before taking him away.

    • Length: 1155 words
  14. Evaluation of a Winters Tale

    stick and start's a syndrome where Leontes assumes paranoia that Polixenes or perhaps everyone is trying to take things out from under him. Originally there was a dance number that was about 5 minutes long but it evolved into more of a entrance tune where the audience gets their first glance at the actors playing. I had several different directions than the rest of the cast at this point, I don't dance for example. I felt that Leontes (playing host)

    • Length: 2705 words
  15. Playhouse Creatures - Act 1, Scene 9 -What do you want your audience to understand about Nell and Mrs Farley? How would you direct it to achieve your aims?

    Mrs Farley delivers the second part of the line "if you don't want to starve" she looks back at the others seeing if she has impressed them and moves back to them to feel that she is in the majority. Nell doesn't see Mrs Farley's jealously as she is in a daze with her experiences on stage. She is away from the crowd standing still and staring out. She delivers the line "I couldn't so it" very static towards the audience but she snaps into reality when she says "You lot buggered off and left me" at this point Mrs

    • Length: 961 words
  16. Coal Mine

    "What can you tell me about the layout of the mine?" Pulling a map from his back pocket, Max began, "The mine has one main shaft with two shafts extending off to the left forming a giant backwards "F. We're going to have to figure out another way to get into the mine and fast. The carbon monoxide level is rising with every breath the miners take." I stared at the map for a couple of seconds when all of a sudden the low raspy voice of Billy Dean came up behind me and said, "We need to find out if there are any survivors, first.

    • Length: 1531 words
  17. Sean OCaseys "Shadow of a Gunman". How would you perform the role of Mr. Gallogher in Act One of the play in order to create comedy for your audience?

    A natural hanging of my head would also be compulsory in reflecting my nervousness and anxiety. I would also be holding the letter of topic is my hand and sub-consciously pressing it and folding it with fidgeting and energetic fingers. As Mrs. Henderson introduces me. "This is Mr. Gallicker". I would look up and take a little baby step forward whilst taking off my hat out of courtesy and politeness. As Mr. Gallogher I would wear large magnifying glasses so that I could use a constant characteristic to blink and push them further up the bridge of my nose at the times where Mrs.

    • Length: 778 words
  18. Free essay

    Live Production - Pains

    to be covered in plastic sheets. Two cast members came on stage in fully black suites, looking as if they were crime scene investigators, with very straight postures and seriously facial expressions. This was a shock to the audience as they were not expecting this scientific opening to the play. The actors walked in a fast pace coming on from opposing sides of the stage to meet centre stage to begin the removal of the plastic sheets over the furniture.

    • Length: 604 words
  19. Read Act 1 of Kindertransport page 3 to page 6 Discuss the effects of Samuelss imaginative use of dramatic techniques and stagecraft in this extract and in the play as a whole.

    This immediately suggests to the audience that secrets, memories and the past is hidden away, closed tight inside boxes. Yet also implies the vacillation later to be seen by Evelyn, as although the contents of the attic are hidden away, they are not quite yet disposed of. This perhaps foretells how indecisive Evelyn is throughout the course of the play. An example of this can be seen when she hesitates to destroy and dispose of her childhood possessions and identity papers, "papers that will stop them from sending me away".

    • Length: 1754 words
  20. A dolls house act one summary

    Helmer comes in from his study, which is adjacent to the living room and criticises her for being a spendthrift. His tone is that of a father talking to a child - quite patronising. This shows that he doesn't approve of her money spending habits and her recklessness with money - he is scared that he may end up in a position of poverty and doesn't want to lose all that he has worked for. Also shows he is very careful with money - wants to make sure it is spent wisely and not recklessly, for he is worried that if spent recklessly he may not be able to keep the place he has.

    • Length: 2309 words
  21. Explore and Compare the constraints of socitey in madame bovary

    The Barricades was skilfully designed and built, coloured darkly, atmospherically setting the audience in the disposition of distress just as the characters were feeling which was well represented by the fractured climbing frame presumably built by scraps including steel and wood. Besides this there were more sets for different acts, much simpler designs making a statement about that part of the play, but the Barricades is one set that audiences will undoubtedly return to the theatre to watch repeatedly.

    • Length: 1021 words
  22. Aristotle described the need for the audience to experience pity and fear while watching a tragedy, explore and analyse the scene of Othello in which your feel these emotions are strong in the audience.

    But without Iago and his vindictive nature there would be no tragedy. What emphasises the emotions further is that the audience have known since Act One, Scene Three of Iago's plans, therefore the dramatic irony that is at work develops our fear for the characters and circumstances by foreshadowing the tragedy about to take place: "Must bring this monstrous birth to the world's light."1 Shakespeare's language here is metaphoric in describing Iago's plan, it foreshadows the plan as devious and cruel. Iago's long-term relationship with Othello has also made him conscious of Othello's "free and open nature/ That thinks men honest..."2 and is attentive of Othello's lack in understanding about the society; which is so full of jealousy, hatred and sin, making the plot for tragedy workable.

    • Length: 2221 words
  23. Aristotle wrote in Poetics that tragedy should contain incidents arousing pity and fear and thus prove cathartic for an audience. To what extent does the plot of Arthur Millers play, All My Sons

    Where society is dysfunctional, Keller's choice simply remains to ignore them and their changing platforms: "...here's a guy is lookin' for two Newfoundland dogs. Now what's he want with two Newfoundland dogs?"3 The audience in turn pity for Keller's character, understanding his lack of knowledge in relation to the macrocosm therefore leading us towards what may be a cathartic experience. Perhaps different audiences react differently to Keller as a character. It is debatable that Keller does not understand the subtleties of life because he is lazy, selfish and his outlook is materialistic, therefore perchance building exasperation in the audience and receiving no compassion.

    • Length: 2163 words
  24. Free essay

    All That Jazz Workshop Diary

    Via the help of angels he then tries to get rid of the contract and buy back his soul, but unfortunately that proves to be a fruitless attempt and he eventually has his soul taken away by the devil. The performance of this piece was not only interesting and engaging to watch, but also allowed to pick up some tips for our own acting and learnt a little bit more about the Brechtian way to act. The Skills Used In the Performance As previously highlighted, the performance was of a Brechtian style.

    • Length: 1072 words
  25. All That Jazz Professional Analysis

    In this analysis I will look at 3 key elements of the video, and apply them to our performances. Firstly I would like to say that I reviewed the tempo of the video. The actors were constantly getting stopped by the directors because they were doing something wrong, but tempo is so quick that the actors are constantly working and trying to do everything perfectly. The actor's hours are around 6 hours a day so to work at that intensity and to have that energy really surprised us all.

    • Length: 510 words

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • "Citizen Kane is often called the greatest film ever made. With close examination of the opening scenes, discuss the significant artistic features and cinematic techniques that led to this response."

    "A different example of Welles' mise-en-shot having great effect is the use of single shots from one angle for extended periods of time. This is a technique rarely employed in modern films, with directors preferring to jump to different angles frequently, showing as much as possible in a different way. This can feel strange to a modern viewer, and I found myself watching some of the interview scenes especially, just waiting for the camera to change, even just for a close-up, but it rarely does. A scene from the newsreel gives a good overall impression of the film. When Thatcher is shown calling Kane a communist, a union leader declares him a fascist, and Kane refers to himself as "One thing only- an American." These different views of Kane are symbolic of the way we only get what people who knew him thought of him, and as the newsreel director said, "what he did." We never find out the real truth, only other people's views, and although clues are given (after all, not many would believe that this cold businessman would so fondly keep his childhood sledge) we never really know the man himself. Michael Whiteman"

  • Compare the Opening Scenes of the Two Film Versions of Lord of the Flies

    "In my opinion the modern film version of 'Lord of the Flies' is the most effective. I feel this way because firstly it is in colour which to me provides a clearer picture and gives a better atmosphere as you can see the change in lighting. And also the fact that not as much information was given makes the audience feel more intrigued as to what is happening. The music in the modern version was a lot more smoother in the sense that it seemed to fit better, and it wasn't just like a series of sounds put together unlike in the first film. Both directors interpreted the novel in their own way and came out with virtually totally different beginnings, showing the change of the way of thinking from the early sixties to the late eighties when the modern version was produced."

  • Analyse 'drugs the facts' and 'The Score,' looking at how genres have been used and subverted in order to attract specific target audiences. How effective is this?

    "In conclusion I think that both drugs leaflets are to an extent effective at using and subverting genres in order to attract a specific target audience. However I feel that 'The Score' was the most successful at attracting a specific target audience through its use of several borrowed generic features found in teenage magazines, the Internet, scientific text books, and various others."

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