• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Provide support for previous research findings that performance is adversely affected by noise, and to discuss the implications if this is true.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Introduction We all frequently experience noise in the course of everyday life and we have probably all at some time or another heard someone remark 'I can't hear myself think'. My colleagues and I have decided to investigate the truth behind this. A decision was made to investigate the effects of noise on mental performance. Firstly it is necessary to define what we actually mean by noise. Noise is defined as any sound that can be considered loud or disturbing, it can be continuous or intermittent. Mental performance can be described as how successfully participants carry out a certain mental test or task. Previous research by Broadbent (1954) suggests that sudden, loud, unpredictable noise may momentarily distract an individual from a task and thereby cause errors if the task requires much vigilance or concentration. We believe however that this finding is low in ecological validity as noise in the workplace, or at school, where most individuals carry out performance tasks, is usually a continuous noise such as a machine operating in a factory. For this reason we decided to base our research on regular noise, which is experienced more frequently in everyday life. Other research by von Wright & Nuimi (1979) compared noise affects on task performance among children aged 6 or 9 years old and adults. All showed slower performance under noisy conditions. My colleagues hope to find support for this finding that noise adversely affects performance. ...read more.

Middle

In the 'no noise' condition subjects were asked to complete the questionnaire in silence. In each condition the experimenter handed out a word search to each participant face down. Once each participant had a word search the instruction was given to begin and a timer was started. After three minutes the instruction was given to stop. The word searches were then collected in. A note was also made of the number of males/females partaking. After the experiment all subjects were fully debriefed on what the experiment was investigating and thanked for their help. Control Measures * Each word search contained 24 missing words in total so the maximum possible words that could be found were the same. * Two of the classes took part in the 'noise' condition then the 'no noise' condition. The other two classes took part in the 'no noise' condition first. This was in order to counter-balance to order effects, which may have been present, such as boredom or fatigue. * The music in the 'noise' condition was played at full volume in order to ensure that the condition contained noise and not just music. * The subjects were not allowed to confer whilst completing the word searches. Materials The materials used were two word searches and a music CD. The word searches can be seen in appendix A. They consisted of 24 words each. The music used was 'Everything We Do' by 'Ja Rule'. ...read more.

Conclusion

Additionally we also had to keep the music at a level that could not damage the subjects' hearing. Our results lend support to the theory of von Wright and Nuimi, that noise adversely affects task performance, as we found performance on a word search to be negatively affected by noise. Our findings also lend support to the findings of Hockey, 1979 and Smith and Stansfield, 1986 as we too found comprehension to be adversely affected by noise, namely comprehension of words in a word search in the present study. Our study also suggests that Broadbent's theory that sudden, loud intermittent noise can harm performance, needs to be modified to state that continuous, loud noise can be just as detrimental. The current study has implications for the safety of people working in noisy environments. For example people operating complex machinery in noisy factories may not perform adequately and mistakes made could endanger themselves and others. The study also has implications for parents. It is clear that for their child to perform optimally at homework they need to be given a quiet home environment, not a noisy one. Further study should now be carried out into other aspects of both noise and performance. Performance in real noisy conditions e.g. in a school dining hall, or performance with intermittent noise could be studied. Alternatively different types of performance could be studied, such as performance on more complex tasks e.g. IQ tests. The effects of the volume of the noise on performance would also provide a further useful insight into human behaviour. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Plays section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Plays essays

  1. Performance Studies

    We wanted to surprise the audience by have the 'bad guys' win so that this wouldn't be typical. We succeeded in achieving this with positive feedback from both the teacher and the audience. We could have developed our piece further by maybe adding a few more extra moves.

  2. Community Performance project.

    Our intention was to liken the Kings flight to a child's game and then follow the contempory theme to make to piece progressively more sinister and violent. This Brechtian technique was created by changing the music dramatically and also the type of movements, creating that sinister feel.

  1. DIGITAL SPECIAL EFFECTS

    of because we wanted our audience to feel exactly how we felt whilst watching this. In the bar there was a guy man as well who isolated himself for a while until the big boss of the group went away and then went amongst the rest of the men dancing sexually around them and touching them.

  2. PerformanceIn performance there are three stages of development when creating a performance piece with ...

    This allowed the audience to connect with the performers in different ways and gave a greater sense of involvement. It was very important for all to play with use of space from the start, including working both near and far the audience and taking into account visual impact/angles for the

  1. Film Studies The Studio System

    Although this gave the makers of films, such as directors and producers, room to express their creativity it placed a heavy constraint upon the amount of movies that could be made, and financial profits. However, despite Hollywood's uneasy birth, by the 1920s it had become one of the worlds leading film producers (Dirks, 2002).

  2. Evaluating The Silence Of The Lambs.

    The film begins with a young woman running through the woods alone. This gives the audience the impression that she is being chased. The music used is an eerie orchestra and gives you a nervous feeling. It then turns out she isn't being chased and is in fact a young an investigation academy trainee.

  1. An Experiment to Investigate How an Active Audience Will Affect a Skilled or Unskilled ...

    The main criticism of this study is that it isn't sport related, therefore making it lack ecological validity. This lack of ecological validity means that the study can't be generalised to the population. Also containing the fact that the study was carried out a long time ago, means that it

  2. My task for the controlled condition test was to construct a 15-minute presentation centred ...

    by scene verbally then we would have been able to work more smoothly. Investigation Each member of the group volunteered to research different things, usually according to their character or their access to resources. The first piece of research I carried out was finding out the meaning of irony, as none of us were sure of its definition.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work