• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The audience observes the opening scene of Hamlet, where they see a man standing guard (Francisco) on the platform of the castle known as Elsinorea, at the dead of night.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The audience observes the opening scene of Hamlet, where they see a man standing guard (Francisco) on the platform of the castle known as Elsinorea, at the dead of night. In films, this place is often depicted, as very high up on the walls of the castle, over looking the dark sea. This would portray quite a somber and haunting theme. Throughout the opening scene, Shakespeare is constantly addressing his audience, in the form of questioning, through his characters. Even, the very first words, uttered in this scene is presented to the audience as a question "who's there?" This portrays the character (in this case Barnardo) as fearful, since he is in the presence of something unknown. This is Shakespeare's attempt, to capture his audience's interest. He does this, by trying to get his audience to show empathy toward Barnardo, making them also worried and fearful of the unknown, which makes the audience want to find out the answer to this rhetorical question, that they have been presented with by Barnardo. Then the audience is allowed to find "relief" which they would have "much thanks" for (since they are now able to name this unknown presence as Francisco.) The audience is then easily silenced, when they are presented with another question "Have you had quiet guard?" making them worry yet again, if there could be another cause for concern. ...read more.

Middle

When Horatio is first introduced to the audience only "a piece of him" is there. Physically he is there but mentally is somewhere else (i.e. half-asleep). Horatio is simply enduing Marcellus and Barnardo. He is quite the skeptic and believes "'tis only but our fantasy". So Horatio is rather a doubting Tom. The audience would be amused by the fact that his attitude is the complete opposite of the others. Also this is an interval between the two events, which just the presence of the super natural since texts becomes more descriptive and there are longer sentences. This would also imply that the was less tension thanks to Horatio's disbelief and the greeting of friends. The ironically Horatio's attitude drastically changes confronted the ghost, he can not believe that he had see it "of mine own eyes". He also refers to the ghost as a "thing" simply because it is not quite explainable what this thing really is. The apparition has "two nights" been "seen". By this point the audience would be very curious and would be very interested to see the out some of this scene. Before seeing the ghost Horatio believed that " twill not appear", the audience wouldn't be able to comprehend whether the ghost was truth or illusion, heightening the suspense and making the audience eager to find out. Bernado sits down to explain what they had seen. The atmosphere would be calmer and the audience curious. ...read more.

Conclusion

Each time Horatio Asked it to speck "what art thou", they would be willing it to reveal why it was there. As the cock crows action occurs as the soldiers try to strike the ghost, The audience would be full of astonishment by the fact that the ghost is really. Horatio then tries to restrain the ghost from leaving by striking it, still, it vanishes. Marcellus thinks that they have committed a grievous error in striking the ghost of the late king. The ghost had "started like a guilty thing/Upon a fearful summons". Horatio recalls that traditionally the crowing of the cock was believed to awake the good of day and serve as a warning to all preternatural and erring spirits that the time has come to return to their confines. As dawn breaks, Horatio and the two officers decide to share the events of the night with prince hamlet, the late king's son. Now the audience would be thinking that the apparition was definitely evil. This scene ends on a hopeful note with the coming of the light the audience would have new hope that the ghost will speck to hamlet. They would be eager to find out his reactions. This scene ends on a note of suspense and mystery. This scene is full of devices to arouse the interest and silence a noisy audience. Tension, suspense and mystery are created through language and actions of the soldiers as they wait and confront the king 's ghost on the castle battlements at Elsinore. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Plays section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Plays essays

  1. The Significance of the Common man in "A man for all Season".

    In this first scene he uses the image of walking on naked, but again the image has meaning. 'Reduce Adam to the Common Man.' Adam was the first man to walk naked in the Garden of Eden; he then sinned and was cast out which represents the fall of man and in Christians' beliefs led to the development of evil.

  2. How is the Common Man presented in A man for All Seasons?

    This proves that Richard Rich's statement 'Every man has his price' is not true. Also Thomas's self-beliefs are a great contrast to those of Richard Rich, who seems to change his beliefs depending on his company or contemporary views. The Common Man has a number of functions within the play.

  1. Free essay

    A Midsummers Night Dream

    The effect on the audience is humour. The Mechanicals enhance the audience's understanding of the theme of love and it transforming power. Shakespeare uses humour to show the ugly can be made beautiful though love. ? " What angel wakes me from my flowery bed...I pray thee, gentle mortal, sing

  2. From dusk till dawn

    The audience is reassured that Ritchie's motives are cruel. The thunder along with the shadow represents a sinister side to Ritchie's personality and his instability also confirms that he is planning something unpleasant. The non-diegetic music and intent stares only occur when Seth is out of the room or not looking at his brother.

  1. "Phoenix Nights"

    Trademarks and in-jokes are two memorable comic conventions Peter Kay uses throughout "Phoenix Nights", will these be able to produce the same exceptional humour as satire. Trademarks and in jokes are used in "Phoenix Nights" to set the standard of humour and establish the audience.

  2. Have decided to explore how Bolt uses the Common Man to emphasise the features ...

    His 'ordinary' characteristics, shown in scene one are reinforced here. More: Take me home Boatman: I expect you'll make it worth my while. The fact that he expects to be rewarded for his job is a common expectation amongst most people and contrasts with More's character, who is rewarded with

  1. Performance Studies: Cross Art Project

    Using different actions and gestures to represent the chaos of everyday life and how someone can have so much to do at one go e.g. Kelly needing to cope with hours of gym then schoolwork and meetings with the psychologist while having everyone shouting at her at the same time.

  2. A Man For All Seasons

    In the play Rich is easily bribed whereas Sir Thomas More isn't. Sir Thomas More advises Rich not to go down the same profession as him. This could be Robert Bolt trying to warn us that bribery and corruption can be easily undertaken.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work