• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

What Techniques does Hitchcock use to make 'Psycho' an effective Horror Film?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

What Techniques does Hitchcock use to make 'Psycho' an effective Horror Film? The plot for the film 'Psycho' was unlike any horror movie that had gone before it. It is at first about a woman who steals money from her boss, and then tries to run away to her lover. This would have deceived the audience easily, because in 1960 (when the film was released) there was no one to reveal the plot over the Internet or by any other means. Around a quarter the way through the film, though, there is a dramatic twist in the plot. Before she reaches her lover's house though, the main character stops at a deserted motel off the main road. There is no-one else staying there. The manager of the motel (Norman) seems very friendly with her, but he seems to have a strange relationship with his mother, who lives in the old house near the motel. ...read more.

Middle

This adds to the atmosphere and seems to add momentum to each strike. The fast cuts as the knife strikes builds up a sense of the knife stabbing. The camera angles are slightly skewed and they do not show all the action, giving an uncomfortable feeling. The lighting is from behind the killer, making them totally dark and much more foreboding. In Norman's room in the hotel there are several stuffed birds. These sinister creatures add a strange atmosphere to the room, as does Norman's statement 'its more than a hobby'. Also, towards the end of the film, when the body of Norman's grandmother is found in the basement of the old house effective methods are used. The camera shows the back of the body, and when she is turned around it zooms in on the skull, emphasising the fright and surprise of seeing the dead body. ...read more.

Conclusion

Also people may drift in and out of watching a movie on TV or video but Hitchcock insisted that if anyone missed the start of the film they were not to be allowed into the cinema, as he felt that his film was not complete without the beginning. So 'Psycho' has lost a large amount of its effect over the years. My personal view of 'Psycho' is that it is an excellent film, especially for the time when it was made. Hitchcock is obviously an exceptional and special director, and he was doing things in film which had never been done before, and crossing lines in what was acceptable in society. Even today 'Psycho' is a superb and stirring film, action packed and surprising, so in its time it must have been an amazing and stunning experience, which would have made a lot of people think. For example it was the first film that showed that the guy next door could be a killer. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Plays section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Plays essays

  1. How does Brian Clark make use of dramatic techniques to make the audience sympathise ...

    Ken because it emphasises the fact that he can't do anything to show her that what he believes is right; he can only talk to her. The way in which Ken talks to Dr Scott, with sexual humour, creates sympathy for Ken.

  2. "In 'Psycho' how has Alfred Hitchcock created tension throughout the film and what effect ...

    point the audience are reminiscent of what just happened with Arbogast, we feel that the same fate is in-store for Lila. I feel that the house represents murder within our minds. She precedes a few paces inside the entrance hall, looking around cautiously at the entrance hall before making her way up the sinister stairs.

  1. Having Watched Gus Van Sant's Remake of Alfred Hitchcock's Film Psycho Analyse How Van ...

    are ambient sounds such as rain and thunder, which, straight away sets the way for something alarming to happen. As the scene progresses we hear other sounds such as Marian writing and Marian tearing the note paper. The lack of orchestral sound at this point in the scene keeps the

  2. Hitchcock deserves his status as an auteur. Explain why this is so making reference ...

    His face is also mostly in shadow. As Norman becomes more agitated, he leans forward, moving from right to left and filling the frame. His look is piercing. Then he reveals his own experience of the madhouse by saying such things as "cruel eyes studying you".

  1. Analyse how Hitchcock Uses a variety of presentational devices and visual images To disturb ...

    Alfred was warned that it was very unlikely that it'd be certified even an X and been allowed to be screened unless significant changes took place. Apart from the issues of blasphemy, by using words such as 'God' and ' hell', Alfred was asked to remove the point that Norman

  2. Opening Video

    decided not to split up, it's Ginger, Whinger, Dinger and Posh, it's The Spice Girls! {{--Spice Girls Performance-}} [Ronnie leaves the stage as the curtains open and Spice Girls perform #Spice Up Your Life#. The curtains then close and the 'Kilroy' music plays.] {{--Kilroy-}} ****TECHNICIANS NOTES**** As the Spice Girls

  1. How do the film makers of 'Chicken Run' use presentational devices to reveal the ...

    as being brave and courageous because she is willing to fight off such an evil, scary woman. There are many other shots used such as an insert shot used when the other half of the poster is shown. The audience sees it from the chicken's point of view and this makes them feel involved.

  2. "Let Him Have It" How effective is the end of the film in gaining ...

    Did he mean, 'Let him have the gun' or 'Shoot him?' The fact of Derek's mental age also created disputes as it was clear he was mentally subnormal and ill prepared to undergo cross-examination at that period in time. From my knowledge of the case I think that Derek Bentley suffered a terrible miscarriage of justice.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work