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women weekly

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Woman's Weekly Woman's Weekly was launched in 1911 promoting "our motto- practical and useful". By the time the extract was produced in 1944 IPC were catering for women who had evolved from housewife to workers through the war. With women being more prominent in a working society the magazine market was to gain a large circulation, which has continued through to today, with a weekly average of 631,451. Many questions have been presented as to whether women's magazines at the time were embracing this social change or trying to encourage women back into the home. Through analysis I hope to discover the social and gender influences in print, advertising and illustrations which made women's magazines such as Woman's Weekly so successful. The front cover from April 29th 1944 sported a familiar layout in current women's magazines. Covering the majority of the page is a middle class woman in 'A Chic hat in Crochet', who is attractive, in full make up and well dressed. ...read more.


Covers appeared throughout the 1940's with the same layout. One edition of Britannia and Eve in September 1943 sports the same cover girl who is well dressed in fashionable clothes and uses the line 'with complete home and fashion sectors' which shows the topics which were appealing to women at the time. The use of the agony aunt 'Mrs Marryat' through the name shows the social necessity for marriage, which was expected at the time. The accompanying picture of an older woman helps evoke a sense of wisdom. Also being a 'Mrs' gives her a form of credibility, being older and having more life experience, making the text more influential to younger women. The response the woman gives holds very old-fashioned views, which encourage the woman to be a 'perfect housewife' By advising the woman 'helping your husband on his way through life' and 'never reproach him with what you have lost' almost dictates that the way to be happy is through taking car of your husband. ...read more.


This however did not exclude the lower classes who would enjoy these advertisements for the desire of the purchase. The use of the 'no coupons required' sign used in the Movie Cleaner would have appealed to all families with the shortage of coupons through the war. The accompanying article entitled 'Overheard in camp' could almost contradict ACME's home connections. Being based on cleanliness would suggest a housewife image however the illustration shows two women in uniform rather than a mother or wife that you would stereotypically associate with such products. The use of the two women in full uniform could almost represent the modern woman who can 'have it all' which would have appealed to women at the time who wanted who were enjoying being out of the house. All of the advertising continues to relate to the home, cleaning and cooking which probes at the question of whether magazines were trying to make the home a more desirable place. ...read more.

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