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Given the fact that Third World countries are underdeveloped (or developing); the causes that led to their underdevelopment are controversial. According to dependency theorists; capital accumulation in the Core had led to the underdevelopment

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Economic Development in Third World Countries Economic Development in Third World Countries Outline Thesis: Despite the difficulty in tracing the, main causes of underdevelopment of LDCs, I believe that the international dependency theory explains most this recession. I. Introduction II. International Dependency Theory: Streams of thought: a) The Neocolonial Dependence Model b) The False Paradigm Model c) The Dualistic Development Thesis III. Examples of Third World Countries that are affected by wealthy states Intervention: a) Argentina b) Cuba IV. The Japanese example of development after massive destruction in World War II and how it is affected by foreign intervention V. Conclusion Economic Development in Third World Countries Given the fact that Third World countries are underdeveloped (or developing); the causes that led to their underdevelopment are controversial. According to dependency theorists; capital accumulation in the Core had led to the underdevelopment of the periphery. On the other hand, other theories claim that the actual problem of underdevelopment is due to the wrong policies and lack of productivity of the less developed countries (LDCs). Although it might seem difficult to trace the actual cause of underdevelopment of the LDCs, I believe that the main reason behind their lagging behind in terms of economic development lies mainly in the dependency theorists' claim of the causes of underdevelopment of the Third World Countries. ...read more.


This concept involves four elements : first the situation where there are those who are superior ; those who are inferior who "can coexist in a given space". Such involve the "coexistence of modern and traditional methods of production in urban and rural sectors" as well as the presence of rich highly educated elite members of society with "masses of illiterate poor people". The second point implies the tendency of the former coexistence between superior and inferior structures to stay for long and not to change. This is proved by the rising international inequalities. As for the third element it notes that the coexistence of superiority and inferiority are even liable to increase and as stated by Todaro , the productivity gap between workers in developed countries and their counterparts in most LDCs seem to widen with each passing year." 12 The third element states that the superior elements are affecting the inferior elements negatively; in which they are not pulling them up but instead are increasing their underdevelopment by trickling down to them or pushing them down more. 13 Even if this trickling down is because of the political hegemony of the inferiors' governments causing the people to not trust their countries and thus do not invest there, it is still affected more. ...read more.


Thus even wise policies and the hard working force of the Japanese needed foreign aid especially from the U.S. to maintain the development of this developed nation. In conclusion, despite the claim of alternative theories that LDCs are responsible for their backwardness, either because of rigidity of their governments' economic and political olicies, or lack of liberation in srengthening international trade and foreign investment, the capital accumulation in the Core affects their recession. This is because as shown in the former examples, development of an inferior state cannot happen without aid from wealthy countries, and in order to maintain any reached development, wealthy countries are still needed even if with rigid ties to maintain trade exchange and profit. End Notes 1. (Michael P. Todaro, 91 ,2000) 2. (Michael P. Todaro, 91 ,2000) 3. (Michael P. Todaro, 91 ,2000) 4. (Michael P. Todaro, 91 ,2000) 5. (Michael P. Todaro, 91 ,2000) 6. (Michael P. Todaro, 91 ,2000) 7. (Michael P. Todaro, 91,2000) 8. (Michael P. Todaro, 92 ,2000) 9. (Michael P. Todaro, 92 ,2000) 10. (Michael P. Todaro, 93 ,2000) 11. (Michael P. Todaro, 93 ,2000) 12. (Michael P. Todaro, 94 ,2000) 13. (Michael P. Todaro, 94 ,2000) 14. (Michael P. Todaro, 144 ,2000) 15. (Michael P. Todaro, 144 ,2000) 16. (Michael P. Todaro, 145 ,2000) 17. (Michael P. Todaro, 107 ,2000) 18. (Michael P. Todaro, 108 ,2000) 19. (Michael P. Todaro, 108 ,2000) 20. ( William R. Keylor,430,2001) 21. ( William R. ...read more.

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