• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

1984, V for vendetta

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Destruction of Individuality George Orwell's 1984 and the movie V for Vendetta both demonstrate a similar theme of the totalitarian government and the perils that follow with such system. In 1984, Orwell portrays the destruction of humanity by using different symbols such as the thought police, Big Brother, and telescreen. Likewise, the movie V for Vendetta depicts representations of the manipulation of the British parliament by employing the Fingermen, Norsefire Party, and BTN. These three symbols in each work render an idea of how the authority can take over the privilege to claim one's desires and individualism physically, intellectually and emotionally. Orwell and James McTeigue portray the physical torture one may be with afflicted from the totalitarian government in their works. In the novel 1984, the thought police report anyone who is caught committing "thoughtcrime." When a person exhibits disapproval or distaste that shows that he or she is going against what the Party claims, they are accused of "facecrime" and eventually vaporized from the Party. ...read more.

Middle

Much like how the telescreen controls people's brain, BTN in V for Vendetta serves as a way of Party reaching all of its citizens in Britain and conveying its messages. BTN delivers false messages to people just as what the telescreen does. The poppet reports "Now, this is only an initial report, but at this time, it's believed that during this heroic raid, the terrorist was shot and killed"; the BTN News reports that the "terrorist" V was murdered trying to be a hero, which eventually ended his attempt to take over the BTN tower. In reality, however, V escapes and takes Evey to his place. The BTN news delivers this way in order to make the citizens believe that rebellion that goes against the government does not exist. By observing the roles of the telescreen and the BTN, one can clearly be wary of how the authority can demolish people's humanity through controlling their intellectuals. The two works illustrate emotional pain an individual goes through with myriad of restrictions that the government puts on its people. ...read more.

Conclusion

Gordon expresses his admiration of V to Evey as he says "You wear a mask for so long, you forget who you were beneath it." The people who are governed by the Big Brother and the Norsefire Party endure emotional torture from the totalitarian society in that they have to constrain their desires and hopes in order to keep themselves away from being tormented by the Party. Orwell and McTeigue utilize the three symbols in each of their works to clearly represent the hazards that may take over our lives in our forthcoming future. The thought police and the Fingermen display the pain people suffer physically from "facecrime" and their incapability of staying away from being mistreated. The two also warn how people can be intellectually manipulated through constant stream of propaganda. Most importantly, they describe how emotional pain of restricting to desire contributes the most in destroying humanity. Through witnessing the dangers that the characters confront in these works, it is crucial for every individual to question what he or she may misconceive and strive to not keep the "boot stamping on the human face." ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 Lee ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Composition section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

3 star(s)

*** 3 STARS

Good, detailed exploration of three main similarities between 1984 and V for Vendetta. Writer clearly knows and understands both works well. Lapses in expression throughout sometimes hinders understanding. Good conclusion.

Marked by teacher Katie Dixon 24/09/2013

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Composition essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Rules sometimes need to be broken. Which view are you in closer argument with ...

    4 star(s)

    Whether you are a manager at the office, a parent at home, or project lead for a corporation, getting people to follow your rules can be trying and exhausting.

  2. Commentary for AS level English Language

    This will hopefully persuade them to see from my point of view and reject the ideas of Ms.

  1. AS English Language Short Story

    He was still livid with Lara for challenging him. Never before had she dreamt of doing such a thing. She had always been incredibly scared of him, after what he had done to her mother, anything was possible. She knew her life was in serious danger and didn't for one second think she would get out of there alive.

  2. AQA English Language AS Coursework - Short story. Have you ever had a ...

    Her name was Sally. She was forty six and had a family of three. My name is 34503 and I'm serving thirty years imprisonment. Commentary and Analysis This short story opens with a rhetorical question to provoke thought to the reader and also gain an early interest.

  1. English Language AS Level Coursework: Creative Writing Piece

    how it is a plea for attention, pathetic, and nodding and agreeing, laughing, then making your excuses and sobbing in a toilet cubicle, because maybe it's true. It doesn't feel that way - if you were doing it for attention surely you would have told somebody, but no one knows.

  2. The short story "Borders" by Thomas King from the book Language & Writing 11 ...

    didn't give up and managed to save herself and Judy (the horse) from the terrible storm.

  1. Impovrished people

    "As winter approaches, the mayor of New York City is moving the homeless off the streets and into Bellevue Hospital" (Ascher 57). Eighner, who experienced homelessness in his life, writes how easy it is to lose a house. Before he became homeless he lived in the house on Avenue B in Austin.

  2. A Heroic Act

    Groups of people encircled the man whilst the teenager performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and within minutes, the driver gradually woke up. People gave him a round of applause for such bravery. The teenage boy didn?t have a reason for his heroic act.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work