• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

"A blaze of love and extinction, was better than a lantern glimmer of the same which should last long years" Analyse Hardy's presentation of Eustacia Vye in Book One in the light of this comment.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

"A blaze of love and extinction, was better than a lantern glimmer of the same which should last long years" Analyse Hardy's presentation of Eustacia Vye in Book One in the light of this comment. In "Return of the Native" we first come across the character of Eustacia Vye in Chapter 7. In this chapter Hardy gives us an in depth description of the character, for example we learn that she "was the raw material of a divinity". Here Hardy is comparing her to a godlike figure which immediately gives us an impression of a character that is above the rest of the characters of the heath. Further divine imagery is used throughout this chapter, other examples are, "On Olympus she would have done well with a little preparation", "In heaven she will probably sit between the Heloises and the Cleopatras." And "She had the passions and instincts which make a model goddess, that is, those which make not quite a model woman." All of these add together to present her as something not of this world, this in a way shows the audience how she doesn't belong with the 'lower' members of society. ...read more.

Middle

with Wildeve and also about her attitude to love, which seems to be that she is not in love with any man, but instead in love with the idea of love. In this way Hardy is presenting Eustacia as an idealist, but in my opinion no man could live up to her ideals. This is apparent in the line "Damon you are not worthy of me; I see it, and yet I love you". Hardy also uses the dialogue to establish her personality, which in my opinion is a very vain character, I came to this conclusion after the line "Have you ever seen anything more majestic that that in your travels?" If look at the imagery Hardy uses with Eustacia, particularly the fire imagery such as describing her soul as "flame like" and describing how "sparks" seemed to rise from her dark eyes. This in my opinion gives the audience the impression that she is like fire, uncontrollable and dangerous yet her live like fire may be short lived and easily extinguished. ...read more.

Conclusion

In this novel, Eustacia is the character that does not conform to society; she clearly could care less about what the natives think of her. One thing I perceived in all of the criticisms was the tone of sympathy and liking that pervaded discussions of Eustacia. In class we could not decide whether or not we actually liked her, but the criticisms painted her not only as a tragic figure, but also as a tragic figure that had no part in her own tragedy. In other words, the criticisms seemed to say that Eustacia was a sad victim of circumstance and fate; she was a brilliant woman stuck in a confining atmosphere. As one critic says, "Eustacia finds her potential for effective activity cripplingly limited...emotional power over other individuals is the only kind of influence [she] can exercise." I found myself feeling sorry for her despite the fact that she is immature, impulsive, manipulative and completely selfish. Perhaps these character traits would disappear had she been allowed to express herself in an atmosphere, and with people, equalling her brilliance and passion. ?? ?? ?? ?? Gary Longshawe ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Thomas Hardy section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Thomas Hardy essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Tess says, Once victim, always victim thats the law. In the light ...

    3 star(s)

    As Judith Weismann tells us, "To Hardy's readers...the word education is likely to have a holy sound, but it is by no means entirely beneficial in Hardy's novel." Tess's having earned this type of education leaves her ill-prepared for dealing with a ruthless man such as Alec D'Urberville.

  2. The presentation of Eustacia Vye in 'Queen of night'

    By showing the many different sides of her character, Hardy makes it impossible to analyse her personality and come up with a single characterisation. The type of personality is hinted at the beginning of the chapter possibly to get the reader to develop their own thoughts and ideas of this

  1. What are Hardy's intentions in his presentation of Eustacia Vye chapters 1-7? How successful ...

    She is isolated from the rest of the heath. Her peculiar tendency to wander the wilds of Egdon Heath in the middle of the night, as well as cross-dress, causing the rest of the Heath Folk to label her idle and a witch. To the Victorian readers the idea of Eustacia cross-dressing and being alone at night would be seen as very odd.

  2. How The Mayor of Casterbridge reflects the social, historical and cultural influences of the ...

    "I like the idea of repeating our marriage... ...It seems the only right course." It appears that they thought that if they told of their past they would probably be ridiculed and snubbed by others, but they had to go through the whole process of courting again as it was counted as extremely suspicious if a man married,

  1. The attitudes and beliefs which influence the outcome of the story 'The Withered Arm' ...

    While in the carriage he acted like the perfect gentleman, allowing Barbara to feel relaxed enough to talk to him as if he were a friend. This ended however when Barbara got out of the carriage. Lord Uplandtowers encroached upon her and said, "It need not have been thus if you had listened to me!"

  2. Return of the Native - Notes.

    She and Olly Dowden walk away in the direction of The Quiet Woman inn that Wildeve owns. Notes Two factors are worth noticing in this chapter. One, the simple folk, the "living countryside," function here as a kind of chorus.

  1. What kind of a woman does Hardy describe Eustacia as being?

    Even at night when one would consider it to be dangerous, Eustacia walks on Egdon Heath as though it has a quiet comfort for her, where she can imagine and dream of her life being more than it is. Eustacia again is described by Hardy to be a fiery and passionate woman with a "flame-like" soul.

  2. Tess of The DUrbervilles. Explore Hardy's presentation of Angel Clare

    He cannot accept Tess as being anything less than perfect after her confession ? he seems it as his unblemished woman not being there anymore, ?You were one woman, and now you are another!? : she has been replaced with a ?fallen? or ?ruined? woman , a common Victorian misconception

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work