A comparison between the poems 'Disabled' and 'Dulce et Decorum est' both written by Wilfred Owen.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

A comparison between the poems 'Disabled' and 'Dulce et Decorum est' both written by Wilfred Owen. During World War I unthinkable events happened that seem to be impossible to comprehend in today's society. Some of the incidents encountered by Wilfred Owen have been expressed in such an apposite way that people who have never experienced trench warfare, can emphasize with the sordid and un-palatable conditions and treatment that the soldiers had to suffer. One soldier that was able to express his emotions, feelings and the things he had seen was Wilfred Owen. One of his poems called 'Dulce et Decorum est' is mainly aimed towards a woman named Jessie Pope who wrote jingoistic propaganda for the "Daily Mail" trying to get young men to sign up for the war by comparing war to a game. At the beginning of the poem he describes with colossal detail what war life was like. Owen at first describes what the soldiers looked like and what condition they were in, in the trenches saying 'like old beggars' and 'coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge.' ...read more.

Middle

In the propaganda, she sanitises the reality of how the war is actually like and she also over shadows the reality by making the language patriotic and giving it a rhyme and rhythm quality. A contrast to both 'Disabled' and 'Dulce et Decorum est'. In this verse he has a bitter and sarcastic attitude understandably that if Jessie Pope could see war life for herself and witnessed how they 'flung' the dead in the dead wagon she would be 'writhing' to the thought that she is encouraging the matter. An example of this sarcasm is when Owen refers to Jessie Pope as being his 'friend' and attacks her for being one of those false, sentimental stay-at-home war enthusiasts who do not know anything about war. So war is one 'game' Jessie Pope will never even be a spectator! 'Disabled' also by Wilfred Owen, is a different nature of poem that concentrates more on the after effects of war and what it took away from the soldier not only physically but also mentally. ...read more.

Conclusion

This really makes you disgusted to the fact that the person who gave the ex-soldier the form consciously knew that he was under the legal age for fighting. What is just as disgusting though is that he knew he was under the legal the age, and he was 'throwing' away his legs. The overall theme of the poem is very diverse! At the beginning the poem is very monochrome describing what it is like in the hospital. 'Ghastly grey.' The poem continues by going more vibrant by the veteran soldier recounting what he used to remember about life. 'Football!' 'Girls!' Then the poem finishes with the beginning monochrome theme and recounting what life is like at present and is going to be like for the rest of his days. Looking over the poems they are both excellent at describing what the war was like and how the soldiers were feeling. Even though I will most probably not experience what the soldiers had to during World War 1, both of the poems give you a strong enough picture of what it was like. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level War Poetry section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level War Poetry essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    A Comparison of "Who's for the Game" and "Dulce et Decorum est".

    3 star(s)

    to the country as a female by using the words "she's" and "her". To me Pope has used this comparison, as it is very persuasive. As men would go to war for the woman that they loved to protect her.

  2. Marked by a teacher

    'Who for the Game' By Jesse Pope, 'Dulce Et Decorum Est' By Wilfred Owen, ...

    4 star(s)

    The soldiers are now awoken by the fact that their lives are in extreme danger and they now have to be fully aware of all their surroundings. The majority of them hurry and get there gas masks on, but unfortunately one of the soldiers miss out.

  1. Compare and Contrast, The shock and horror presented in the three war poems - ...

    What is going to happen to him in the future? In pain, living in this disgusting hospital? 'now, he will spend a few sick years in institutes'? I will have no freedom to live my own life, just do what the rules consider wise, this is how we felt in Dulce et Delcorum Est, we felt trapped.

  2. Marked by a teacher

    Analysing Wilfred Owens' Poem Disabled.

    4 star(s)

    (As the poem soon makes clear, the six hundred cavalrymen of the Light Brigade were aware of this themselves.) The poem suggests that it is these moments before the battle has begun that are the Brigade's greatest glory. The phrase "Valley of Death" refers to an episode of John Bunyon's

  1. Dulce et Decorum Est", written by Wilfred Owen, the film All Quiet On The ...

    Gas! Quick boys! - An ecstasy of fumbling, fitting the clumsy helmets just in time" This shows that soldiers lives depended on seconds and that one mistake could cost them their dear. This must have made the soldiers pretty tired and exhausted.

  2. A comparison of Dulce Et Decorum Est and The Disabled.

    Owen describes the soldiers of being "Drunk with fatigue" Owen is saying that the soldiers are so tired that it is as though they are drunk. Owen is trying too saying that the soldiers are as though they don't know entirely what they are doing.

  1. Compare and contrast the presentation of war and the poets' attitudes towards war in ...

    The soldiers are all tired and fatigued, "men marched asleep". This is a metaphor to show that the soldiers are extremely exhausted. The soldiers are all extremely tired, their boots have worn out and "many had lost their boots". The soldiers are also covered in blood, "Blood-shod".

  2. Compare and contrast the various poetic treatments of the theme of death in war ...

    The pace in the opening stanza of "Dulce et Decorum est" is also deadened by the use of enjambement, which seems to take away from the rhyming scheme of the poem and thus stops us from 'singing' the poem. This in contrast is exactly what Brooke wishes us to do.

  • Over 180,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work

Marked by a teacher

This essay has been marked by one of our great teachers. You can read the full teachers notes when you download the essay.

Peer reviewed

This essay has been reviewed by one of our specialist student essay reviewing squad. Read the full review on the essay page.

Peer reviewed

This essay has been reviewed by one of our specialist student essay reviewing squad. Read the full review under the essay preview on this page.