• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

A comparison of a transcript and a literary text

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

A comparison of a transcript and a literary text Passage A is a transcript of a real interview with a man about his childhood as an orphan. This links to Passage B which is an extract from Charlotte Bronte's 'Jane Eyre' in which orphan Jane is talking to another girl at the school she's just started. The link between the two passages, therefore, is the topic of orphans. The transcript is an example of spoken language. It starts off being quite formal but gets more informal as you go through, maybe showing that the man is getting more relaxed in his interview and more relaxed in what he's talking about, however, the topic of conversation is quite personal as it is about his childhood and his feelings as an orphan. This is part of a real interview and from the response given we can guess that the question was something like 'what did it feel like being an orphan/growing up as an orphan'? ...read more.

Middle

childhood (.) I think that was (.)'. He also uses lots of fillers such as 'eh', 'you know', and 'sort of'. He also uses elision such as 'weren't' and 'there's' which is a sign of informal, more colloquial, speech and also is a sign of spoken language in the fact that he hasn't thought about what he's saying. Along with when he corrects himself it shows that he's just saying what comes into his head, it's more spontaneous than written language. The extract is an example of written language. It is an extract from Charlotte Bronte's novel 'Jane Eyre' in which Jane is talking to another girl who lives in the school that Jane has just been sent to. There are two speakers in the extract. The first speaker is Jane. Jane is the dominant speaker in the conversation and we know this because she asks all the questions and keeps the conversation going, for example 'and what are the other teachers called?' Jane is more childlike than the second speaker and sounds more na�ve with all the questions she asks such as 'Then why do they call us charity-children?' ...read more.

Conclusion

This as quite a tired tone and suggests that she is not entirely happy there but doesn't want to tell Jane that. This extract is much more structured than the transcript. The sentences in the extract are much longer with one complex sentence lasting 6 lines. The use of language is different for both speakers and the use of different tones and sentence length makes each of the speakers sound very different. However, both the transcript and the extract are similar in the respect that the use of pauses and tones in both pieces give a good idea of the feeling of the people talking. In the transcript the use of the pause in the sentence 'we had these (.) three aunties and uncles' gives a sense of reflection and suggests that he is thinking about his past and is a very reflective tone. In the extract, sentences such as 'What is Lowood Institution?' suggests Jane's naivety and youth whereas sentences such as 'Because fifteen pounds is not enough for board and teaching, and the deficiency is supplied by subscription', suggests the other girls knowledge of her surroundings and the use of language suggests she is well educated. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Other Criticism & Comparison section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Other Criticism & Comparison essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    The English Patient

    5 star(s)

    To Hana the wild gardens were like further rooms." (Ondaatje, M., 1994: 45) This representation of the place supports the patient's claim that there ought not to be borders, as "they are reasons for international conflicts and wars, and they stop people from assimilating." (Abu Baker, A., 2008: 46)

  2. Marked by a teacher

    Presenation of childhood in Jane Eyre and Once in a House On Fire

    4 star(s)

    room, this shows the reader that Charlotte Bronte does not want us to empathise with the Reed family as she uses technical terms such as "clustered", which do not allow us to relate or empathise with the Reed family to describe the relationship between mother and siblings.

  1. comparsion of jane eyre and wuthering heights

    This is in stark contrast to Heathcliff and Catherine as their union is not blissfully met and happens only in death. The use of marriage as a tool of repression instead of the romantic clich� helps Emily Bronte portray that marriage is not always a reflection of love.

  2. How do the writers of Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights use setting and atmosphere ...

    Bronte infuses this scene with literary techniques such as alliteration of "rain rushed", which floods the more positive setting. The short yet abrupt rhyming words, "grave" "amazed" emphasize the powerful atmospheric conditions as they lend a sense of foreboding to the scene.

  1. The Language of Protest

    one hundred years later the Negro is still languished.... One hundred years later..." The constant repetition increases the intensity of the moment and King's speech gathers great momentum at this stage. Every time King repeats himself, he says it with greater conviction, he shouts it louder, and the crowd respond

  2. Explore the representation of women in Jane Eyre and Small Islands

    This contains element of women's genuine concerns such as the influence of the war verses the definition of femininity while women were expected to become more independent in order to maintain their status while living in patriarchal Britain. So this novel is not setting a precedent, merely following in a long tradition.

  1. Commentary to Text Transformation of Catcher in the Rye and Girl Interrupted

    This was in order to create a connection between the two novels and therefore between the illness and their troubles, through the charity. I kept to the idiolect of the characters to help make them recognisable and used both quotes and anecdotes of both characters to narrate the stories told in the respective novels.

  2. Irreconcilable Differences in Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea

    However Rhys? attitude is that of rejection and the wanting of love and affection. In Jane Eyre, Bronte shows Mrs Reed a little deluded when she is on her death bed. In the extract Mrs Reed says my thoughts deceive me.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work