• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

A Comparison of "The Charge of the Light Brigade" by Alfred Tennyson with "Dulce Et Decorum Est" by Wilfred Owen

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

A Comparison of "The Charge of the Light Brigade" by Alfred Tennyson with "Dulce Et Decorum Est" by Wilfred Owen War poetry is written for a variety of reasons. They may be written from the poet's personal experience or from second-hand knowledge; often an important factor affecting the poem's significance and viewpoint of war. A war poem may be written to console the bereaved: to reassure them that a soldier's death is a noble and heroic sacrifice. Glorifying war in poetry has also been used as government propaganda to keep public morale high and to encourage patriotism during a war. A poet who has served in a war may wish to express their personal reaction to the battle scene, they may write of the grief, terror and bitterness of war. A war poem could be written to depict the reality of warfare, a true image that aims to dispel the mythical vision of war seen by the public. "The Charge of the Light Brigade" by Alfred Tennyson is a narrative poem based on Russel's account in the Times of the Charge, which took place during the Crimean War. The poem describes the Light Brigade's hopeless charge towards the enemy's main artillery position. ...read more.

Middle

He is addressing the propagandists of the time such as Jessie Pope, who gave a false image of war to na�ve young men and encouraged them to fight without warning them of the horror of the battlefield. Wilfred Owen begins his poem by describing in the first stanza the overwhelming exhaustion of the marching soldiers. He uses vivid similes to depict the inhumane, feeble state of the soldiers; they are like "old beggars," and "hags,"- unusual descriptions for young soldiers. The stereotypical image of soldiers is of upright, smartly dressed men, not "bent double" and "under sacks." Owen creates a slow pace in the first stanza with lines running onto another and words such as "trudge" and "limped" suggesting the slow movement and weariness of the soldiers. The fatigue of the men is established through the portrayal of the soldiers' oblivion to their surroundings, they are "deaf to the hoots of gas shells." The mechanical action of the soldiers is exaggerated for emphasis; the men did not literally march asleep but were so exhausted it was a similar thing. The soldiers' fatigue affects all their senses as alcohol does and the are described as "drunk with fatigue." ...read more.

Conclusion

The construction of the poem is not as neat and ordered as the that of "The Charge of the Light Brigade" and similarly its view of war is not as clean and ordered as in Tennyson's poem. Tennyson was not present at the Charge of the Light Brigade; he received his information from Russel's article and wrote his poem specifically about the Charge. His view of war was therefore that of the general public and he had not experienced it so he was not able to judge the glory of war for himself. Wilfred Owen, however, fought in the First World War, one of the most terrible wars ever fought and had seen the dreadful waste of life that took place as millions of men died pointlessly. His experience made him bitter and his poetry is written from his own knowledge and judgement. "Dulce Et Decorum Est" is a war poem that can be applied to any war of any era for any side; it has a universal significance. Of the two poems I personally prefer "Dulce Et Decorum Est" as I consider Owen's honest portrayal of war a valuable insight which should be remembered and help people to understand the suffering of soldiers serving in war as this is too often forgotten. ?? ?? ?? ?? 5 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level War Poetry section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level War Poetry essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    A Comparison of "Who's for the Game" and "Dulce et Decorum est".

    3 star(s)

    To them this man was already dead. He was isolated and full of fear; it was a waste of life. "white eyes writhing" Owen describes how the soldier physically looks. The line suggests that the entire colour from the soldiers eyes had disappeared also alliteration is used this also creates a powerful effect.

  2. A comparison of 'The Charge of the Light Brigade', 'Dulce Et Decorum Est'and 'Anthem ...

    This gives the impression of a very well equipped, smart, and impressive army. The verse tries to convey the power and strength of the Light Brigade. The soldiers 'Flashed as they turned in air'. This suggests that they were so powerful and energetic that they were almost flying.

  1. Compare 'Dulce Et Decorum Est' by Wilfred Owen', 'Charge of the Light Brigade' by ...

    the futility of the war, underlining that the 'patriotic' soldiers died pointless deaths, not heroic but unjustified, untimely ones. The use of Latin in the last lines makes for a respectable and convincing finale, as the use of this 'scholars language' proves Owen to be educated and intelligent, therefore more

  2. Explore the portrayal of war in Lord Byron's 'The Destruction of Sennacherib', Alfred Tennyson's ...

    of 'The Charge of Light Brigade' but 'Dolce Et Decorum Est' only has 3. The rhyming schemes are different though the 'Destruction of Sennacherib' has rhyming couplets 'aabb' 'fold ...gold' this keeps a good steady pace/rhyme to the poem however 'The Charge of the Light Brigade' does have rhyming couplets

  1. "The Charge of the Light Brigade" by Alfred Tennyson - War Poetry

    The metaphor featured occurs in the next line - As under a green sea, I saw him drowning. This situation is linked to the earlier use of the word floundering, and carries on the sea theme in a more definite way.

  2. Compare and consider the ways Tennyson and Owen present war in "The Charge of ...

    On the other hand, Owen was a soldier serving in World War One and therefore had a personal experience of the suffering and horror. These experiences directly affected Owen's view and attitude towards war and the way he expressed it.

  1. Personal response to "Dolce et Decorum Est", "Disabled" and "The Charge of the Light ...

    A "solemn man who brought him fruits" approaches the man. This person thanks the disabled man, presumably for his efforts in the war, but he is worried bout the man's "soul", or his spiritual well being. This verse is only 3 lines long compared to the 16 before.

  2. How do 'Dulce et Decorum Est' by Wilfred Owen and 'The Charge of the ...

    The poem was thought to have helped boost the morale of remaining British soldiers fighting in the Crimean War after the Battle of Balaclava, as well as those at home. In 'The Charge of the Light Brigade', we are immediately thrown into the excitement and action of the Battle of

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work