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A Streetcar Named Desire

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Introduction

Literature: A Streetcar Named Desire Choose a play in which the deterioration of a marriage or a relationship is important. Show how the dramatist presents the deterioration and why it is in your opinion important to the play as a whole. Tennessee Williams fast paced drama "A Streetcar Named Desire" is centred on the relationships of the Kowalski family and their relation Miss Blanche Du Bois. The plays sees the relationship between in-laws Blanche Du Bois and Stanley Kowalski form and deteriorate following events which the play itself entails. The dramatist develops the deterioration of this relationship in several ways and we find that the deterioration of this relationship proves to be important to the play as a whole. This essay will explore the various ways in which the dramatist achieves the deterioration of the relationship between Blanche and Stanley and this deterioration's importance to the play as a whole. The drama "A Streetcar Named Desire" is centred on the Kowalski-Du Bois family and deals with the issues that arise when Stella Kowalski's Sister Blanche comes to live with her and Stanley. ...read more.

Middle

It allows Stanley to see a little of Blanches true colours and helps to create tension between Blanche and Stanley. This tension is required in order to help convey the various themes of the text, which involve opposing ideas such as; dreams versus reality, death versus desire and old versus new America. Hence by using Blanche's conversation with Stella the dramatist presents the deterioration between Blanche and Stanley's relationship; which is, in my opinion, important to the play as a whole as it creates tension. This deterioration is further continued by the dramatist by the use of Blanche and Mitch's relationship to further drive a wedge between Blanche and Stanley. It is with the use of this relationship that Blanche's deceitful nature is exposed. Mitch is one of Stanley's best friends and following her move to New Orleans becomes Blanches so called "beau". Blanche and Mitch grow very close; however Blanche lies to him, giving him the impression that she is very prim and proper especially among men. ...read more.

Conclusion

This signifies the utmost peak of their relationships deterioration. Not only does it completely destroy Blanche's state of mind but also her relationship with all the residents of New Orleans including her beloved sister Stella; "I couldn't believe her story and go on living with Stanley." This loss of all potential allies to herself destroys Blanche and lands her in a mental hospital come the end of the book. This method of presenting the deterioration is also important as it shows the final out come between the opposing themes that Blanche and Stanley have both been representing through out the play. It shows Stanley; reality, New America, death, conquering over Blanche; dreams, Old America and desire. And so this method of the deterioration of Blanche and Stanley's relationship is important to the play as a whole. In conclusion "A Streetcar Named Desire", the thrilling drama by Tennessee Williams uses the deterioration of Blanche and Stanley's relationship; shown through Blanches attitude to Stanley, Blanches relationship with Mitch and Stanley's domination of Blanche in scene ten; to explore the theme of dreams versus reality to a greater extent. ...read more.

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