• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Act 2 Sc2, also known as the 'balcony scene', is arguably the most well known piece of literature in the world, and certainly by an English author. Even now, four hundred years after it was written, modern day romantics are still referred to as 'Romeo'.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

What makes Act 2 Sc 2 so engaging and memorable for the audience? Act 2 Sc2, also known as the 'balcony scene', is arguably the most well known piece of literature in the world, and certainly by an English author. Even now, four hundred years after it was written, modern day romantics are still referred to as 'Romeo'. The scene starts with Romeo abandoning his friends as they leave the exclusive Capulet's party. He heads for Juliet's window, and soon finds it. Even from this early stage, it is patently obvious that Romeo has true feelings for Juliet. 'It is the east, and Juliet is the sun. Arise fair sun, and kill the envious moon'. This demonstrates Romeo's true affection and physical attraction to Juliet. Even to a non-romantic at heart, the following lines are simply magical. 'Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven, having some business, do entreat her eyes to twinkle in their spheres till they return'. ...read more.

Middle

At this juncture, it has been established that Romeo and Juliet are truly in love. Having said this, there is something else that Shakespeare establishes with his language - that they are in danger, which in itself will heighten an audience's anticipation. In a lot of Romeo's early comparisons of Juliet, he likens her to things that exist in the sky, 'The brightness of her cheek would shame those stars,' and 'It is the east and Juliet is the sun'. In Elizabethan times it was believed, as to an extent it is now, that our fates and destinies are 'written in the stars' as it were. This constant imagery of the sky and the night does, to myself at least, stand out as a hint that something untoward will happen What's more, in Juliet's mind it seems that she may have some qualms as to whether Romeo does actually love her, as in line 92, 'Thou prove false: at lovers perjuries, they say Jove laughs'. ...read more.

Conclusion

I think that one of the things that caps off the brilliance of this scene however, is its structure. The scene begins very slowly, as if the lovers are timid. The language represents this, as there are a lot longer dialogues between the two, and their parts are long compared to those later in the scene. Progressively, there is more interaction between, as if they are becoming close to each other, until at the end of the scene, there is only ever two or three sentences said before the other speaks. This also represents the increasing excitement that both are experiencing as they fear that they will be caught by the nurse. In conclusion, I think that the things that make the balcony scene so memorable are Shakespeare's use of language to portray the inhibitions of the couple, but also to portray their love, and his usage of metaphors, to illustrate the different feelings felt by Romeo and Juliet. Ajogu Akoh 10S Ms Johns English cwk ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Romeo & Juliet section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Romeo & Juliet essays

  1. Comment on how Shakespeare uses language to communicate the feelings of Romeo and Juliet ...

    Romeo continues to go on about his love for Juliet and even ignores her second warning. "Therefore thy kinsmen are no stop to m. If they do see thee, they will murder thee." Romeo is not affected by this and replies.

  2. Romeo and Juliet-Act 2 scene 2 - Balcony scene

    And she replies:" Do not swear at all; or, if though wilt, swear by thy gracious self." Swearing by yourself was meant Juliet trusted Romeo very much. The vow guaranteed that they would both see each other again. Romeo's observation: "O that I were a glove upon that Hand, That I might touch that cheek,"shows Romeo's physical longing for Juliet.

  1. Direct Act 2 Scene 2, the balcony scene

    between his courtly love for Rosaline and his genuine love for Juliet for example when he first sees Juliet and says, "Did my heart love till now? forswear it, sight!" Romeo is questioning with himself that did he really love someone before he saw this incredible beauty standing in front of his eyes.

  2. How did Shakespeare create tension in act 1 scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet

    this time this was a very offensive word to be called. While tension increases romeo and Juliet meet and fall in love the share kisses and proclaim there feelings for each other and how ever they do not realise that they are sworn enemies.

  1. Romeo and Juliet Act 2 Scene 2.

    Juliet admits embarassement at being overheard telling of her love. She rejects formal ways of speaking and behaving : " farewell compliment", and asks Romeo directly if he loves her. She pleads for him to answer truthfully: " pronounce faithfully", admitting she declared her own love for him unaware of his presence.

  2. Romeo and Juliet coursework- Analyse the balcony scene in terms of its significance for ...

    the ground and them not being able to reach each other signifies how difficult it may be for them to have a proper relationship with each other. This is where the prologue comes in again, it mentioned that their love will be difficult but it also said that it will be difficult because of their feuding families.

  1. Why is act one scene V of Romeo and Juliet an effective piece of ...

    Section 3 is when Romeo first catches a glance of Juliet and the fact of love at first sight is exaggerated by the way he speaks of her, using a metaphor: "She doth teach the torches to burn bright". This tells us that Juliet's beauty is much brighter than that of the torches - so she is very beautiful.

  2. Romeo and Juliet - The balcony scene Act 2 scene 2.

    make it into the Capulet residence because the ball is like 'a fancy dress party.' For Romeo he wears a knight's costume, the reason Luhrmann has done this is to tell the audience that Romeo is 'a knight in shining armour' this gives connotations of a brave soldier which also

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work