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Act 2 Sc2, also known as the 'balcony scene', is arguably the most well known piece of literature in the world, and certainly by an English author. Even now, four hundred years after it was written, modern day romantics are still referred to as 'Romeo'.

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Introduction

What makes Act 2 Sc 2 so engaging and memorable for the audience? Act 2 Sc2, also known as the 'balcony scene', is arguably the most well known piece of literature in the world, and certainly by an English author. Even now, four hundred years after it was written, modern day romantics are still referred to as 'Romeo'. The scene starts with Romeo abandoning his friends as they leave the exclusive Capulet's party. He heads for Juliet's window, and soon finds it. Even from this early stage, it is patently obvious that Romeo has true feelings for Juliet. 'It is the east, and Juliet is the sun. Arise fair sun, and kill the envious moon'. This demonstrates Romeo's true affection and physical attraction to Juliet. Even to a non-romantic at heart, the following lines are simply magical. 'Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven, having some business, do entreat her eyes to twinkle in their spheres till they return'. ...read more.

Middle

At this juncture, it has been established that Romeo and Juliet are truly in love. Having said this, there is something else that Shakespeare establishes with his language - that they are in danger, which in itself will heighten an audience's anticipation. In a lot of Romeo's early comparisons of Juliet, he likens her to things that exist in the sky, 'The brightness of her cheek would shame those stars,' and 'It is the east and Juliet is the sun'. In Elizabethan times it was believed, as to an extent it is now, that our fates and destinies are 'written in the stars' as it were. This constant imagery of the sky and the night does, to myself at least, stand out as a hint that something untoward will happen What's more, in Juliet's mind it seems that she may have some qualms as to whether Romeo does actually love her, as in line 92, 'Thou prove false: at lovers perjuries, they say Jove laughs'. ...read more.

Conclusion

I think that one of the things that caps off the brilliance of this scene however, is its structure. The scene begins very slowly, as if the lovers are timid. The language represents this, as there are a lot longer dialogues between the two, and their parts are long compared to those later in the scene. Progressively, there is more interaction between, as if they are becoming close to each other, until at the end of the scene, there is only ever two or three sentences said before the other speaks. This also represents the increasing excitement that both are experiencing as they fear that they will be caught by the nurse. In conclusion, I think that the things that make the balcony scene so memorable are Shakespeare's use of language to portray the inhibitions of the couple, but also to portray their love, and his usage of metaphors, to illustrate the different feelings felt by Romeo and Juliet. Ajogu Akoh 10S Ms Johns English cwk ...read more.

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