• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

"All The major Romantics...were engaged...in the rediscovery of nature, the assertion of the one-ness of man and the rest of creation" James Reeves. What has interested you about the ways in which Coleridge has asserted this one-ness?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

"All The major Romantics...were engaged...in the rediscovery of nature, the assertion of the one-ness of man and the rest of creation" James Reeves What has interested you about the ways in which Coleridge has asserted this one-ness? Throughout Coleridge's works, we can see that he tries to unify nature, through both the workings of his superior secondary imagination and his language. He constantly strives to give a sense of togetherness between all aspects of Nature and himself, even if through the idea that we are united in our diversity. Coleridge also shows us the effects of a lack of this 'one-ness', effectively emphasising its importance. Perhaps the most frequent impression of 'one-ness' in Coleridge's work is given by the assertion of God in Nature. In The Aeolian Harp, Coleridge talks about "the one life within us and abroad/ Which meets all motion and becomes its soul". This 'one life' is God, and Coleridge emphasises how He connects us all through the soul. Coleridge also unifies nature in the following description, "A light in sound, a sound-like power in light, /Rhythm in all thought, and joyance everywhere". ...read more.

Middle

The line "In Nature there is nothing melancholy" also suggests this balance, of many things coming together to make 'Nature'. Referring to the earth as a single being is another way in which Coleridge emphasises this interdependence. We can see this exemplified in many of his poems; in Fears in Solitude he describes 'My mother isle', in Frost at Midnight he refers to 'the general earth' and in The Nightingale he speaks of vernal showers which 'gladden the green earth'. By acknowledging the earth as a whole, we see Coleridge's appreciation for the fact that each individual piece of nature on its own may not be significant, but when combined in unity with all other parts of nature, it makes the one beautiful entity-the earth. Coleridge's struggle to unify his split self is also evident in his work. In Frost at Midnight and he poetically expresses his recuperative attempts to do this, mainly through connecting himself to his surroundings and his family. In Frost at Midnight, he links himself with the little flame dancing in the fireplace. He writes "Methinks, its motion in this hush of nature/ Gives it dim sympathies with me who live"; giving the impression that he is desperately trying to make connections. ...read more.

Conclusion

It is also interesting how he asserts the concept of pantheism in his work without having any intellectual conviction himself that it is acceptable, which we may find hypocritical. However, it also shows that the need to unify is very strong for Coleridge, and this could offer explanation as to why he does it. The desire to find connections between things is clearly key to Coleridge's work, and considering his perceived superiority of the unconsciously unifying secondary imagination, and it can be seen that by displaying 'one-ness' in his poetry, and therefore displaying this imagination, that he is trying to elevate himself. Works Consulted * M. H. Abrams, ed., 1960: English Romantic Poets - Modern Essays in Criticism. A Galaxy Book, Oxford University Press, New York. * York Notes Advanced, Samuel Coleridge Selected Poems, York Press * The Cambridge History of English and American Literature in 18 Volumes (1907-21). Volume XI. The Period of the French Revolution.VI. Coleridge. � 10. The Poetry of Nature; Anima Poet� * http://www.sparknotes.com/poetry/coleridge/section6.rhtml WORD COUNT FOR BOTH ESSAYS: 2990 1 The Cambridge History of English and American Literature in 18 Volumes (1907-21). Volume XI. The Period of the French Revolution.VI. Coleridge.� 10. The Poetry of Nature; Anima Poet�. 2 http://www.sparknotes.com/poetry/coleridge/section6.rhtml 3 "Coleridge's Conversation Poems"', by George McLean Harper, ?? ?? ?? ?? Sarah Louise Cooper 12DGG Coleridge Coursework ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Other Poets section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Other Poets essays

  1. No More Hiroshimas - James Kirkup

    This idea of cheapening the memory of the atrocity is continued when he quotes from a brochure that describes the park of peace memorial in a way you would expect of a far more obvious tourist attraction; "Includes the Peace Tower, a museum containing Atomic-melted slates and bricks" The fact

  2. A Marxist Criticism of Goblin Market

    Laura openly tells Lizzie of the bliss she experienced in eating her fill of the 'sugar-sweet' fruit (183), without compromising their relationship at all. Rather than rejection, Rosetti writes of the closeness, almost co-mingling of the sisters: 'Golden head by golden head, Like two pigeons in one nest'.

  1. Social and literary background to Mirza Ghalib's works. Mirza Asadullah Beg Khan known ...

    However, he did not let his debt depress him unduly, though there were certain times when he felt it keenly and wrote bitterly about it. In 1847, when Ghalib was in his fiftieth year, he suffered a terrible and quite unexpected blow.

  2. In Dickinson's poetry, the worlds of man and nature are inextricably interlinked'. With reference ...

    peaceful and beautiful to something brutal and disturbing, which is linked to mankind since mankind also changes paths very easily from good to evil or vice versa showing the link between mankind and nature.

  1. The Romantic Period and the poems of Blake

    The boy is taught to regard sun shine as a part of God's love giving off light and heat to the "flowers and trees and beasts and men". Thus the boy learns to view all things in nature as a part of God's kingdom, receiving his love and protection.

  2. Compare and Contrast James Joyce & Charles Dickens

    Stephen was looked after when at home; he had his uncles "Charles" and "Dante" who clapped when his mother danced. This shows a happy environment, a family together, until the "Vances" who came from a fractured home. Stephen is taken off to boarding school where he is unprepared for the rigours of school due to his overly protected previous lifestyle.

  1. To what extent is Hardys poetry dominated by relationships?

    In Beeny Cliff the waves are, "...engrossed in saying their ceaseless babbling say" The waves move forward mechanically like time. Though the waves might have seemed "far away" when they were together, time has caught up with them. Time has now taken Emma to a place where she, "No longer

  2. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner-Issues of Paganism and Christianity

    Coleridge used archaic and antiquated language in the poem in order to make credible the idea that it was written before his time. The phrasing of the poem often sounds Biblical, for example 'And he stoppeth one of three'. In Part the Sixth there is a line that reads as

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work