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Analyse and comment on the way your idiolect changes depending on who you talk to and the context you talk in.

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Introduction

´╗┐Analyse and comment on the way your idiolect changes depending on who you talk to and the context you talk in. George Orwell said-?If thought corrupts language, language can also corrupt thought?. This illustrates the power of language over our thought. People change their register when communicating with different people: including myself. The way in which we speak has changed when communicating with audiences has developed noticeably from the way we write; so much that it has almost become another language entirely. An idiolect is the speech habits of a particular person. Everyone?s idiolect is idiosyncratic and our personal idiolects are influenced through our lives and are adapted according to context, audience and purpose. Because of this, a diverse range of lexis, registers and accents can be heard throughout all of England which produces a variety of spoken language which has slowly distanced itself from the traditional Standard English. ...read more.

Middle

But the other non-fluency features such as the filler ?er? which show thought and propels the conversation, even though nothing is being said wouldn?t be used in more formal conversations. This is because of the fluency and articulation and use of lexis that are used in formal conversations are very similar to Standard English. As a teenager, I use idiomatic expressions that I hear around me, especially when at school when I?m surrounded by peers or when I?m online and talking to my friends. The sort of expressions I use are vernacular, such as ?LOL? (abbreviation for Laughing out loud) and OMG (oh my god). I use such expressions because I also text like this, and also because I am influenced by my peers who generally say similar expressions as I do. Mainly teenagers use fillers such as ?like? and other words and phrases are a sign of belonging to a younger generation. ...read more.

Conclusion

This is to appear more polite and mature. Also, my idiolect involves me sandwiching two words together to form my own, such as ?fantabulous? (fantastic and fabulous) or ?awetious? (awesome and righteous) as well as phrases such as ?Oh my!? I often quote lines from TV shows and movies too. For example, when I am playfully angry at someone, I sometimes say ?Avada Kedavra? (from Harry Potter) or go ?I will burn you, I will burn the heart out of you? (from Sherlock). These quotes from shows and movies show my personality and my humorous side. I am also very sarcastic and use a mocking tone to make fun of others. I have a slower pace and a more serious tone, usually for comic effect. However, I am only sarcastic with my peers, as I am more polite to the elders I have some respect for. This makes my idiolect more personal. ...read more.

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