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Analyse the humour and comedy of Act 1 in Much Ado About Nothing

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Introduction

´╗┐Analyse Act 1 in regards to comedy With the play, Much Ado About Nothing comedy is generated through numerous ways within its structure, language and form. Conflict and battles of wit between characters in the play create humorous scenes, which are typically intelligently crafted in order to create hilarity. In addition, the utilisation of over exaggerated language and sarcastic remarks, with metaphors and puns spawn comedy. The obvious, comical scenes within Act 1 are created with the two protagonists Beatrice and Benedict. The role of women in society in the time period was to be quiet and have little power however; Beatrice goes against society?s unspoken rules and contradicts social conformity by being witty and clever with smart remarks so therefore goes against expectations. Due to her continuous conflict with Benedict, she generates comedy in the form of satirising physical features and aspects of his personality. ...read more.

Middle

This is evidently presented when Benedict states that Beatrice is a ?parrot teacher?. This is comical as Benedict personifies Beatrice to be a parrot that is typically renowned for their repetitive nature, in repeating whatever someone Sais. Furthermore, comedy is caused through sexual references and sexual comedy. This is signified when Beatrice refers to Benedict as ?Signor Mountanto? at the start of scene 1 act 1. This phrase is a common fencing term or fencing thrust however it can mean two things. The idea that he is a flashy swordsman or this could be a connection of Benedict?s penis thrusting into an enemy soldier, so therefore there is an association of aggressive sex. Beatrice is clearly commenting on his sexual prowess, as being a womaniser. We find this amusing as Beatrice is once again going against social conformity, speaking of sexual matters with men involved. ...read more.

Conclusion

The fact that Benedict is devoted to the idea he will die to be superior o a bachelor, allows his character to pick the fun out of anyone who has fallen into the trap if love and marriage. Pleasure and merrymaking is projected through the banter and conflict between Beatrice and Benedict within the first act this is clear when Leonato states there is a ?skirmish of wit between them?, which clearly emphasises the fact that there battle for wit is obviously noticeable in order to get the upper hand. The reason for enjoying this humour is because of the fact that they want to be superior over one another. In conclusion, we can infer that there are numerous attributes that contribute to the humour and comedy of Act 1 in Much Ado About Nothing. However, the most noticeable element is the battle of wit between Beatrice and Benedict. The utilisation of satirical comedy and overly exaggerated sarcasm along with puns emphasises the fact the reason for their conflict is the recognition and gratitude they will feel. ...read more.

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