• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Analyse the humour and comedy of Act 1 in Much Ado About Nothing

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

´╗┐Analyse Act 1 in regards to comedy With the play, Much Ado About Nothing comedy is generated through numerous ways within its structure, language and form. Conflict and battles of wit between characters in the play create humorous scenes, which are typically intelligently crafted in order to create hilarity. In addition, the utilisation of over exaggerated language and sarcastic remarks, with metaphors and puns spawn comedy. The obvious, comical scenes within Act 1 are created with the two protagonists Beatrice and Benedict. The role of women in society in the time period was to be quiet and have little power however; Beatrice goes against society?s unspoken rules and contradicts social conformity by being witty and clever with smart remarks so therefore goes against expectations. Due to her continuous conflict with Benedict, she generates comedy in the form of satirising physical features and aspects of his personality. ...read more.

Middle

This is evidently presented when Benedict states that Beatrice is a ?parrot teacher?. This is comical as Benedict personifies Beatrice to be a parrot that is typically renowned for their repetitive nature, in repeating whatever someone Sais. Furthermore, comedy is caused through sexual references and sexual comedy. This is signified when Beatrice refers to Benedict as ?Signor Mountanto? at the start of scene 1 act 1. This phrase is a common fencing term or fencing thrust however it can mean two things. The idea that he is a flashy swordsman or this could be a connection of Benedict?s penis thrusting into an enemy soldier, so therefore there is an association of aggressive sex. Beatrice is clearly commenting on his sexual prowess, as being a womaniser. We find this amusing as Beatrice is once again going against social conformity, speaking of sexual matters with men involved. ...read more.

Conclusion

The fact that Benedict is devoted to the idea he will die to be superior o a bachelor, allows his character to pick the fun out of anyone who has fallen into the trap if love and marriage. Pleasure and merrymaking is projected through the banter and conflict between Beatrice and Benedict within the first act this is clear when Leonato states there is a ?skirmish of wit between them?, which clearly emphasises the fact that there battle for wit is obviously noticeable in order to get the upper hand. The reason for enjoying this humour is because of the fact that they want to be superior over one another. In conclusion, we can infer that there are numerous attributes that contribute to the humour and comedy of Act 1 in Much Ado About Nothing. However, the most noticeable element is the battle of wit between Beatrice and Benedict. The utilisation of satirical comedy and overly exaggerated sarcasm along with puns emphasises the fact the reason for their conflict is the recognition and gratitude they will feel. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Much Ado About Nothing section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Much Ado About Nothing essays

  1. Discuss in detail Shakespeare's presentation of women in Much Ado About Nothing

    not as common or typical in a modern day girl of Hero's age as it was in Shakespearean times. Although Hero's lines in the play are often merely functional and slightly lacking, it is this; her lack of speech, that most effectively represents her character and role in society.

  2. What do we learn about the Society of Messina in "Much ado about Nothing"?

    "Hence from her, let her die" His speech in blank verse (which also shows his degree of edification) following his daughter's incorrect humiliation illustrates his immediate and sincere aversion to his own flesh and blood at the thought of Hero's discourtesy, even in lack of sufficient evidence, and in way also demonstrates his duplicity as a father.

  1. A Marxist Study of Much Ado About Nothing. The ideology perpetuated in Much ...

    Pedro has wooed Hero for himself, Don John the bastard disapproves of such match as Hero "is no equal for his birth" (II, i, 144). It is important for one to marry a member of the same league. Marriage, which subjects women to men's power and control, can also prevent

  2. What do we learn about the society of Messina in the play 'Much Ado ...

    Leonato is the governor of Messina, however he is the not the highest ranked person in the play. Leonato is a wealthy man, with one daughter, Hero. I get the idea he is the wealthiest person in Messina, with Antonio close behind.

  1. How Is The Theme Of Deception Apparent in Much AdoAbout Nothing

    Claudio is further deceived, along with Don Pedro, by Don John when he shows them Hero's apparent disloyalty and 'immoral' nature. In Act 3, Scene 2 Don John approaches Don Pedro and Claudio in order to 'warn' them of Hero's disloyalty.

  2. To what extent does the portrayal of women in Much Ado About Nothing subvert ...

    In comparison to Benedick, Beatrice?s fall from disdain has less of a dramatic impact, accentuating her sincerity and glee, whereas Benedick has to give himself reasons to requite her love, and consider how others will react.

  1. Explore how Much Ado About Nothing uses the comic genre to allow Shakespeare to ...

    Leonato confronts Don Pedro and Claudio with resentment, whilst trying to remain courteous, over publicly shaming his daughter whilst she was innocent. In confrontation, Leonato addresses Claudio as immature, stating that ?If thou kill?st me, boy, thou shalt kill a man.? Leonato reminds Claudio that ?thou hast kill'd my child?,

  2. What comic devices does Shakespeare use in the opening scene of Much Ado About ...

    Some interpret this line in this manner; Leonato (teasing) implied ?of course not, Signor Benedick. You were only a child when my daughter was born, and not yet old enough to seduce my wife.? This use of bawdiness acts as a comedic effect because creates a build up of tension

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work