• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Analyse the ways in which Shakespeare uses dramatic conventions in his plays and why they are significant.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Analyse the ways in which Shakespeare uses dramatic conventions in his plays and why they are significant. A dramatic convention is the specific actions or techniques the actor, writer or director has employed to create a desired dramatic effect/style. Dramatic conventions are significant in Shakespeare's plays as they created dramatic irony and they got the audience involved, making them feel like they were a part of the trick or lie. Dramatic conventions are still used today in TV soap operas such as Hollyoaks. In Hollyoaks eavesdropping is used. It has had a modern twist put on it, as it is put across through a visual aid, such as a mobile phone (reading of text messages). Asides and soliloquies are still used too in the form of thought bubbles and voices in the characters' heads. Shakespeare used dramatic devices because there were so little stage directions in Shakespeare's time; mood, atmosphere and many of the characters' thoughts and actions are revealed through dialogue and dramatic devices. The main political beliefs at the time Shakespeare wrote these plays was Machiavellian Politics in which man will do anything to succeed and that anything can be bought. Three of Shakespeare most famous play were: Nothing (Act 2 Scene 3, Act 3 Scene 1 and Act 3 Scene 3), Hamlet (Act 3 Scene 4) and Othello (Act 4 Scene 1). Much Ado About Nothing is a comedy and Hamlet and Othello are tragedies. Much Ado About Nothing was written in 1598/1599 this was known as Shakespeare's comedy period. ...read more.

Middle

To maximise the effect of the eavesdropping Hero then says she is going to tell Benedick he must try to hide his passion as Beatrice does not love him back and is over dramatic: "No rather I will go to Benedick, and counsel him to fight his passion." This will make Beatrice feel guilty. This trick works so easily because Beatrice already loves Benedick, she is too proud to realise. To emphasise the fact how much Beatrice have been tricked Hero uses rhyming couplets: "Some Cupid kills with arrows, some with traps". This makes it so obvious to the audience that Beatrice has been tricked. After Beatrice hears Hero and Ursula she also speaks in a soliloquy. The soliloquy is almost a sonnet. It is spoken in iambic pentameter; this means that words go together in pairs like Beatrice and Benedick should go together. In this scene the eavesdropping creates a lot of dramatic irony because Hero is tricking Beatrice; Hero thinks that it is so foolish for Beatrice to fall for the trick. However the last two scenes have showed the positive qualities of eavesdropping, yet you feel it is like the cloud before the storm. In Act 3 Scene 3 eavesdropping is not used in a deliberate way. It is accidental eavesdropping. It suggests how the Machiavellian class system has the potential to create tragedy. As Machiavellian encourages spying, eavesdropping and trickery, this helps them to climb the social ladder whatever the cost. ...read more.

Conclusion

This has all been done by Iago when he puts ideas in Othello's head. When Desdemona drops her handkerchief, Emilia gives it to Iago. He plans to plant it in Cassio's lodgings: "Trifles light as air/Are to the jealous confirmations strong/As proofs of holy writ." Othello returns, accusing Iago of torturing him and demanding proof of Desdemona's infidelity. Iago claims to have heard Cassio talking of her in his sleep and to have seen him use her handkerchief. A director could modernise the play in film by replacing the handkerchief with another item of clothing. The director achieves this well in the film "O". They replace the handkerchief with a scarf. The audience in this scene will have noticed that Iago is trying to put ideas into Othello's head. They will feel almost guilty as well because they feel like they want to shout out to Othello that Iago is trying to trick him. They will also feel powerless, as they cannot help Othello but must watch the story unfold right in front of their eyes. This gives more power to Iago. This is how Shakespeare used eavesdropping in three different plays, to create very different effects. It shows us how it can have positive and negative effects. Eavesdropping is probably the main dramatic device that has been carried through the years into modern television and film. This shows just how a successful playwright William Shakespeare was. To have plays that have gone through 400 years and are still very successful, is a great achievement. ?? ?? ?? ?? Andrew Reid 4C English Essay Draft 1 05/08/2011 19:31 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Other Criticism & Comparison section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Other Criticism & Comparison essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    The English Patient

    5 star(s)

    Hana is a dynamic character, and the novel is in many ways the story of her maturity into adulthood. Hana goes about her duty with a Christian belief that has been somewhat compromised by the war. While she refrains from praying and outright religious ceremony, the allusions she makes are clearly religious.

  2. Marked by a teacher

    The strength of Much Ado About Nothing lies in its balance of contrasting elements

    4 star(s)

    For example, characters of a noble birth are very apparent in Much Ado', with Don Pedro, Prince of Arragon, Count Claudio and Signor Benedick featuring heavily in the story line. Further more, the overall class of the characters is high, the majority being educated, well spoken, refined and self confident.

  1. Compare and contrast the writers presentation of the consequences of obsessive love in: Othello, ...

    than the wife lets on, there are continuous images on the bed being 'nailed down' and her not being able to move it. Could it be right to suggest she has a duty to provide sex? In Victorian England the man had nuptial rights, which meant he could have sex

  2. Euthanasia should never been introduced. Persuasive essay.

    absolute dominion.National Conference of Catholic Bishops (USA), 1991 * The right to die * The Roman Catholic church does not accept that human beings have a right to die. * Human beings are free agents, but their freedom does not extend to the ending of their own lives.

  1. Female characters in "The Kite Runner", "Hamlet" and the short story "A Lot to ...

    He seems to be under the impression that, though women are frail, weak, and delicate, all women deceive and take part in treachery. He does love Ophelia, but in the end, he feels that Ophelia would betray him, as all women do.

  2. Compare and contrast the ways Margret Atwood and William Blake present the power of ...

    in a way that prevents them from being free spiritually. This poem is also narrated in the voice of a child, likewise to ?The Chimney Sweeper? but is located in Songs of Experience. The honesty in this poem: ?Worn through with the dreary shower?, contrasts with the positivity and passiveness

  1. Compare and contrast the presentation of the villain in Othello, Wuthering Heights and The ...

    Iago stabs Emilia from behind]?. Iago has intentionally murdered the other character where as Clegg claims throughout the novel that he has no intention to harm Miranda and when she dies he does mourn for her, ?We would be buried together.

  2. Control, submission and rebellion in the novels The Handmaids Tale by Margaret Atwood, Memoirs ...

    This suggests that Sayuri has ignored the main rule of being a Geisha. ?Memoir?s of a Geisha? illustrates rebellion in a much more subtle way unlike the other texts. In the film V for Vendetta Rebellion is shown in the most dramatic way, change and vengeance.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work