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Analysing the representation of speech: Texts A and B are both similar texts in that they have the same purpose to try and change peoples views on animal rights.

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Introduction

AS English Language and Literature Assignment 5 ? Analysing the representation of speech: comparison Texts A and B are both similar texts in that they have the same purpose ? to try and change peoples? views on animal rights. However, the ideas are conveyed in two different styles. In text A, Brigitte Bardot demonstrates the reality of how many animals are treated these days. The text is written in a serious manner and the author gets straight to the point by using very strong, vivid vocabulary which is shown in the first sentence: ?Who has given Man (a word which has tragically lost all its humanity) the right to exterminate, to dismember, to cut up, to slaughter, to hunt, to chase, to trap, to lock up, to martyr, to enslave and to torture the animals?? Here she uses a continuation of descriptive verbs which attracts the readers attention and shows them just a few of the many ways animals are treated. Brigitte Bardot is fighting for equality between humans and animals so that the earth is no longer a place ?where men rule?, but ?a shared Paradise.? The middle paragraphs in this text all end in ?(for our survival ?)?. ...read more.

Middle

She is asking for people?s help ?to act, high time? and ?to regain the dignity the animals have never lost?. Text B is written as a conversation between two individuals, with the use of slang language. The text has been made to show not only the grammar and vocabulary that the people use, but also the way in which they speak (pauses, elongation, etc.). This gives the reader an idea of the age of these two individuals ? they are possibly quite young adults. ?R? and ?J? have two very different opinions on animal rights: ?J? believes that being vegetarian will help to stop the ?industrialised butchery that cows an sheep an chickens have to endure?. However ?R? thinks that you being vegetarian won?t help anything ? if you eat free range meat it?s fine. He believes that meat is what we were born to eat: ?our teeth are designed to rip an check meat an all that?. He uses very visual language here to get his point across. He does believe though, that the animals shouldn?t have to endure such horrid conditions. ...read more.

Conclusion

He is a young person who doesn?t come across as having an awfully strong personality. I can see people really responding to Brigitte Bardot?s speech as it will have certainly got them thinking, and anyone who cares about the animals will want to assist her in solving the problems which they face. This is a strong piece of work. GOOD POINTS: Clear and sustained focus on the question with a strong comparative element. You clearly identify similarities in content but contrasts in style. A good overview at the opening of an answer is very reassuring to an examiner. You embed your quotations clearly so that they support your argument. Remember quotations should be as short and therefore as focussed as possible. Each needs to be integrated into the flow of your argument. You correctly identify and more importantly analyse key patterns of language use and their effects in representing the authors' points of view. You clearly represent and evidence your conclusions on the charaters behind the voices and their social and political motivations. Your work is concise, fluent and economical without being brief. All are excellent examination qualities. Therefore, apart from some minutiae eg Para 3 'number' for 'amount' I have very little to correct. Annabel Pomeroy Student Number SS126208 ...read more.

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