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Analysis Of Bog Queen

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Introduction

Analysis Of Bog Queen Seamus Heaney, as part of his 'Bog Poems' collection, wrote the poem, 'Bog Queen'. In this poem, Heaney brings together the main themes of his bog poems, including religion and sacrifice, pain and suffering, conflict within the Irish society and the links between the past the present. Heaney believes that Mother Ireland is Mother Earth, of which it pulls everyone together, showing that Irish land is of great importance. In this particular Bog poem, the Bog person made known here is a female woman. The poem opens with, "I lay waiting", and giving the impression that she knows that she will be revealed once again. Heaney here uses first person, which could signify that Heaney is identifying himself with the Bog Queen, showing that he has a deep connection with the woman and the themes of the poem. He uses first person to identify himself with the Queen, to show his anger towards the thoughts that Ireland is not learning from history, that it is going to lead into destruction. Heaney loves Ireland, but now what it does. The poem then progresses, "Between turf face and demesne wall, between heathery levels and glass toothed stone". The use of, "turf face", shows that she is completely enveloped in the deep earth. ...read more.

Middle

The Queen continues to wait, however the process of her waiting is shown, "my brain darkening, a jar of spawn, fermenting underground". Her brain is decaying; her containment is just a, "jar" of space. "Dreams of Baltic amber", is further used to describe her. This line is very interesting as it joins together what she stands for, her dreams, with what the earth is doing to her. Her dreams, unlike her body are being preserved by the, "Baltic amber", although she herself is decaying, as her dreams are preserved, it gives the sense that as Ireland is connected so much to the earth, then there is still hope for it to resolve its differences. In the seventh stanza, Heaney connects the Queen with the earth and the history of Ireland. "My diadem grew carious", the royal diadem, which is her crown, slowly, "grew carious"; the earth corroded it over time, just like Ireland. The regality of Ireland, its, "gemstones", its people and culture of importance, were lost to the earth, the "peat flow". This stanza shows a certain fall from grace, that the Queen, Ireland lost everything, her delicate gemstones of her crown, links to the, "bearings of history", her importance was lost. The Queen's sash had turned into, "black glacier", frozen over by the cold winter and turned dark and black. ...read more.

Conclusion

The plait of hair, her umbilical cord is, "slimy", possibly to show that the Queen has had enough the eventual decay has led to all her waiting to be over. The eventual release of the Queen leads towards a violent and dark conclusion to the poem, "I rose from the dark", her ascent from her rotting grave, "hacked bone, skull-ware, frayed stitches, tufts, small gleams on the bank". She rises up, all the invasions and conflicts that have happened in Ireland will now be shown. It can be said that the Queen has now risen, to exact her revenge. Irony is shown; the earth has not only decayed her, but on the contrary, also preserved her. Even though she was mummified, she watches over, she knows all that goes on, therefore Heaney shows her to be some sort of caution. In conclusion, the poem, "Bog Queen", provides a range of imagery and language showing the various themes Heaney wants to put forward. He himself is pulled in two directions; he loves Ireland because he feels he has to, however he does not like what it does, to itself and to others. Even though feelings of hatred towards the imposing and destruction is shown from the English, Heaney also shows the destruction Ireland is causing itself. Heaney used the Queen to symbolize Ireland, history never dies, it is just preserved, until one day, it will speak out. ...read more.

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