• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Analysis on Siren Song

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Mike Kimlat Analysis on Siren Song Both prose and poetry are often times appreciated and regarded for their form and content. Readers of poetry seek a good plot, a wise moral, and/or a visually and audibly appealing form expressed through such literary techniques as metaphors, similes, rhymes, and meters. Margaret Atwood, however, omits these conventional techniques. In her poem, "Siren Song," Atwood chooses not to exploit a multitude of widely-used literary tools to capture her audience; instead, the author uses a psychological approach to lure the reader. Notorious poets and playwrights entice their readers by exploiting techniques such as meter or rhyme schemes. These techniques aid the writer in conveying his or her message or telling a story. John Keats, for example, uses a rhyme scheme and iambic pentameter in his poem, "Ode on the Grecian Urn." Rhymes tend to appeal to readers because they are memorable. William Shakespeare, like Keats, uses iambic pentameter and enforces a specific type of form in his sonnets and plays: Shakespeare uses 14 lines divided into two clear parts, an opening octet (8 lines) ...read more.

Middle

Atwood's trickery forces the reader to find out what comes next. "Shall I tell you the secret/ and if I do, will you get me/ out of this bird suit?" (Lines 10-12). Her cunning words attempt to woo the reader into freeing her "out of this bird suit." Atwood's omission of a plot is purposeful; she demonstrates that a 'story' of no substance can be as appealing to the reader as a complicated plot with a definite climax. A plot serves the purpose of providing a story to concern or interest the reader. Atwood begins her poem by saying, "This is the one song everyone/ would like to learn: the song/ that is irresistible:." Instead of establishing a plot, or commencing a story, Atwood quickly grasps the reader's attention by making him or her want to learn the song. She then describes the song and stresses its negativity. "because anyone who has heard it/ is dead, and the others can't remember" (Lines 8-9). ...read more.

Conclusion

The reader may easily conclude that the speaker is in fact a siren; one who wants to convince the reader into hearing the song and falling in to the siren's trap. The siren wants the reader to become its victim and wants the reader to hear the song. The only way the song can be heard is through the siren because everyone else who has heard it is either dead or doesn't remember it. The sirens in Homer's The Odyssey approach Odysseus and his men in a similar fashion as the speaker of "Siren Song" approaches the reader. The sirens woo the men and take control of their psyche which is parallel to the way the speaker of "Siren Song" (also a siren) addresses her reader. Both poems exemplify the power of women over men. They seek the same purpose: to take control. Clearly, Margaret Atwood expresses her own unique style in this poem. She creates a poem that can stand on its own, without many literary techniques and without any plot or story. She presents her poem as "irresistible" psychologically rather than utilizing traditional literary techniques to lure the reader. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level The Handmaid's Tale section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level The Handmaid's Tale essays

  1. Examine how Atwood presents Offred's sense of self in "The Handmaid's Tale"

    This helps them to empathize with Offred's struggle to regain her sense of self from this omnipotent government. They can begin to understand that Offred must keep her memories alive, in order to remember her 'self'; without these memories her identity would surely be consumed by the regime.

  2. Presentation and significance of settings in 'The Handmaid's Tale'

    the Commander's wife sitting in her garden on page 22 and states "From a distance it looks like peace." Gilead is a false image of domestic security where, as Offred says, "nothing moves." This statement is strengthened when Offred comments on the difference between centres and borders.

  1. How Far is The Handmaids Tale a Dystopian Text, Specifically at the Regime of ...

    Women in Gilead have no independent status. The lack of real identity for the Handmaids indicates that they are 'owned' by their Commanders. This is an example of the dehumanisation of women in Gilead, which has worked well for the society.

  2. how does margret atwood use language as a tool of oppression

    The women in society are dressed according to their social functions which includes colour, the repeat of colours display a link between the statuses of the citizens. 'Everything except the wings around my face are red' and 'gathered to a flat yolke that extends' creates an image of confinement and

  1. Analyse Atwood's narrative & linguistic approaches and how chapter 9 contributes to the novel ...

    This simile suggests his manly hairiness, the traditional masculinity, reiterating his wild animalistic qualities. All the use of animalistic features for Joe depicts him as some what of a hairy man "buffalo". This links to chapter eight where the narrator says "his hands at any rate are intelligent, they move

  2. Explain how control and rebellion are presented in 'The Handmaid's Tale' by Margaret Atwood

    birth rates have tripled, which is reflected in Gilead's aim to create a 'superior' white race by ridding society of Blacks, Jews and homosexuals. Also, 29% of marriages now end due to adultery which all reinforces Atwood's bleak view of 20th Century life and implicates why such an emphasis is placed on the regulation of people's private lives.

  1. Compare and contrast how far the authors of The handmaids Tale and Stepford Wives ...

    "Stepford Wives" was published in 1972 and Levin created Stepford depicting men swapping their liberated wives for robots. Both novels show the result of men wanting to return to the position of power they had in the 1950s. Both authors create a vision of an anti-feminist ideology developing from the society they were both writing in.

  2. Through the analysis of Happy Endings by Margaret Atwood, it can be concluded that ...

    After a more detailed examination of the stories, however it becomes obvious that each individual is trying to find love. Though love is a common goal, each person?s conditions for a meaningful, loving relationship is different for everyone. This is clearly demonstrated by the different situations in which the characters find themselves.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work