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animal & human sensory perception

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Introduction

TOK Essay - Perception - Henrik Rydh The human body is only capable of experiencing a minuscule portion of the senses that exist. Our mind and body has evolved to provide us with the ability to hear, see, smell, taste and feel. Humans may be the only species that have such a varied and balanced skill of each of the five senses. Nonetheless, this advantage to other living beings can be seen as a disadvantage when compared to other their senses. The majority of living species on the Earth as we know it, are provided with the ability to use a combination of these senses. However, those that are further enhanced in using one sense often prove to perform less effective in their other senses. ...read more.

Middle

Dogs can smell better and hear better than us. But, would we give up the ability to taste our favorite food, chocolate, wine or sweet? That is an inability all dogs are born with; their tongues serve for nothing more than a cleaning tool. Dogs taste only a variety of tastes, but with their nose. Have you realized when you have a cold and your nose is blocked, your taste buds show to perform far worse than when you are healthy. All of our senses relate to one another and affect one another. Vision is a sense I would never wish to loose, many say it is impossible to live an extreme life without the ability of vision. ...read more.

Conclusion

Just with the English skier or a bat, the English skier cannot see at all and the vision bats are able to use is at a level said to be useless to the bat. He cannot use his eyes to see where he is moving, nor can bats, yet a bat is known to be an expert flier using sound perception, possibly, the man's senses may also have enhanced his sound and touch abilities enough to enable him to balance himself at such a velocity. Clearly, as seen already from dogs, humans and bats, our senses are all perfected to perform better in certain areas. Also, when one area of our senses are damaged, others seem to perform more efficiently. In essence, the biological constitution of a living organism limits, but also enhances certain methods of gaining knowledge. ...read more.

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