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Antony and Cleopatra analysis of Act one Scene one

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Introduction

Antony and Cleopatra analysis of Act one Scene one 'Antony and Cleopatra' by William Shakespeare is a play about a Roman General Antony and an Egyptian Queen Cleopatra. In Act one Scene one it shows how Antony puts Cleopatra in front of his army but Cleopatra just manipulates him successfully. The first part of the play is set in Alexandria. Cleopatra is a powerful woman and she knows she can get everything she wants. She loves the attention being on her, as she thinks so highly of herself. Cleopatra is experienced and manipulating but she is also captivating, 'Everything becomes her.' She uses charisma and charm to persuade people so she always gets her way. Cleopatra has good looks so she can have any man she wants. She knows that Antony is madly in love with her and he will do anything she commands. She is externally fascinating and strong minded. Antony is a General, before meeting Cleopatra he was seen has a respectful and honourable man. ...read more.

Middle

Together as a couple they appear to the audience as well-known and mighty. Through Philo we learn about Antony before he enters. Even though he is Antony's friend he tells Demetrius how the men are no longer inspired by him. The audience can see the ups and downs of Antony before he appears. They understand from Philo that he used to be a straight man but now he has been weakened by a woman. Philo is betraying his friend. From Philo the audience learn a lot about Antony's past and future in a short amount of time. When Antony and Cleopatra have entered an left Demetrius and Philo continue to discuss Antony. Demetrius states how Caesar is so unimportant now to Antony, he has been blinded by love. Demetrius questions this though to Philo showing his astonishment to the way Antony behaved. The audience can see that Antony has changed completely, for the worst. Demetrius says how even the common people speak lowly about him, this showing the audience how hated he has become. ...read more.

Conclusion

Cleopatra emphasises how Caesar is younger that Antony to annoy her lover and possibly make him jealous. Cleopatra is shown how she uses reverse psychology and is successful with it,. For example she tells Antony to go to Rome but she knows by telling him this, he will stay. The audience can now see just how gullible and weak Antony is. Just from the first few pages of the book, the audience can see the true personalities of Antony and Cleopatra. Antony used to be an inspirational general now he is thought of as little by the poorer people. Cleopatra is seen as an extraordinary sensuous woman to the men. I think it is a good idea for Philo to be talking about Antony first, so the audience know background about him and can begin to decide their opinions of him. The start of the play also helps to make a dramatic opening. Just from the entrance the audience can visibly see the importance and status of Cleopatra without dialogue needed. Therefore each of the main characters are introduced in a different way, making the play more appealing. ?? ?? ?? ?? English Drama ...read more.

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