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Arthur and George by Julian Barnes Critcal Analysis. This extract recounts the experiences of a young boy named George. He is the main character, and the passage focuses on his perspective of the world.

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Introduction

Arthur & George by Julian Barnes This extract recounts the experiences of a young boy named George. He is the main character, and the passage focuses on his perspective of the world. The first and main relationship is with his mother. George being very timid and naive turns to his mother who teaches him to understand the world around him, disciplines him into obeying and stating what boundaries he has. The writer uses a third person narrator in this extract but the point of view is limited to "George's world" and his understanding of it. ...read more.

Middle

George is a young boy, who is obedient to his parents and very timid. His mother disciplines him and tells him what he is "not allowed to" do such as "shout[ing]", "run[ing]" and "soiling [him]self". The things he is not allowed to do are written in a form of a list, as if he is remembering them. This emphasises the notion of how "everything ought to be" his mother compels on him. George is suspicious of the world beyond what he is familiar with. ...read more.

Conclusion

Moreover, later in the passage we find out that both his parents have affiliations with the church. His father writes and preaches sermons and his mother teaches Sunday school at the Vicarage (church). The passage is very literal and there is a lack of metaphors and imaginary that may depict a notion that has to be taken into further analysis. Having a very neutral tone this extract describes the life of a young boy growing up. Through the third person limited perspective and simple diction, we are able to view his world in his own terms and try to understand and live his experiences. ...read more.

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