• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Baba and America - the novel explains the statement Baba loved the idea of America. It was living in America that gave him an ulcer by depicting Baba as a person who was more dependent on Afghanistan and its culture than he first believed.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Throughout 'The Kite runner' Baba's character is portrayed as that of a man used to having the respect of others and someone who has strong beliefs and ideals that do not always coincide with those around him. After setting up an orphanage in town, something that gains him yet more respect, he tells Amir to 'Piss on the beards on those self-righteous monkeys'. Baba is referring to the Islamic teachers in Amir's school and we can see that Baba is very much his own man, not somebody who likes the idea of there being something greater than him. As a reader, we see Baba's character through Amir's eyes and his strong opinions prove him to be somebody who follows his own morals, meaning that he is not a sheep within the Afghanistan culture and does not easily succumb to pressure of those around him. ...read more.

Middle

By chapter 11 it is understandable to readers why living in America could of given Baba an 'ulcer' because of who he was in Afghanistan. The novel depicts him as a very successful person, who was always at the centre of attention. 'At parties, when all six-foot-five of him thundered into the room, attention shifted to him like sunflowers turning to the sun to the sun' shows us Baba's position is society and therefore allows readers to reflect on what he has to lose. With their move to America we see Baba lose everything that he has ever held in importance in his life. From being in a very high position in Afghanistan, with wealth and respect, Baba went from a somebody in his national country to a nobody in America. ...read more.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the novel explains the statement 'Baba loved the idea of America. It was living in America that gave him an ulcer' by depicting Baba as a person who was more dependent on Afghanistan and its culture than he first believed. It is possible Baba suffered from a classic case where he did not realise what he had before he lost it, although he was always finding faults with Afghanistan culture he was still a part of it and he owed the respect and wealth he had accumulated to Afghanistan. The symbol of America as a land of the free was enticing for Baba because it was so different from Afghanistan culture, but as Baba later realised change isn't always for the best. ?? ?? ?? ?? 'Baba loved the idea of America. It was living in America that gave him an ulcer.' How does the novel explain these two contrary statements? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Other Authors section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Other Authors essays

  1. Kite Runner- analysis of first chapter

    Rahim Khan, who plays the major role of making Amir realize his big mistake that of betraying his best friend Hassan and conveys to him that "there is a way to be good again". Rahim Khan has also been shown as a father figure later on in the novel which

  2. (Creative Writing) Imagine that Baba writes a letter to Rahim Khan after he and ...

    Sometimes, when I have some time free, I think about Afghanistan; the sugarcane fields of Jalalabad and the gardens of Paghman. Strange how you never really notice the beauty of something until it is taken away from you. I miss the hundreds of people that milled in and out of

  1. Discuss the relationship between Keith and Stephen that is presented in the first Six ...

    He wanted to go home but Keith tempted him to stay by spotting his mother. Stephen liked to be involved and even wrote down '1217', which Keith directed him to, but their boredom did vanish as well as their 'mutual peevishness' and his 'unbelief,' this shows the reader that they

  2. In A Passage to India the Marabar Hills and Caves possess a powerful symbolic ...

    Forster shows the interaction, or more correctly, lack of interaction between the British and Indians at the wildly unsuccessful bridge party. This shows the futility of trying to build a bridge between the British and Indians. It is a disaster as the British stay on one side of the room

  1. Discuss Hosseinis exploration of the parent/ child relationship in the Kite Runner. ...

    However Amir and Baba's relationship does improve a little when they move to America. Although it does not make Baba more supportive of Amir's choices as Baba is very disappointed by Amir's decision to become a writer because he does not believe it's 'real work' this is reflected in Baba's

  2. Explain how Hosseini sets out to make the reader side with Hassan and not ...

    In the book as a whole, the protagonist goes through this journey with the reader and experiences each element separately until the end where the three fuse together to mould his life. In keeping with Genette's narratology theories, all the chapters but the first are told in a diegetic narrative,

  1. How do Paulas early experiences shape the way she develops as a person?

    There is sexual abused hinted in this novel as Paula recalls her childhood memory with her father when "he put me and Denise up on his knees and did horsey-horsey while stared at Carmel" the innocent action of "horsey-horsey" is being contrasted with Paula's father staring at Carmel as if she is to be left out of the childhood's play.

  2. 'Prejudice is reasonable if it preserves culture' - To what extent is this the ...

    However, this play strives to show through the power of the theatre, barriers such as race, culture and wealth can be broken down. This is what Ketch shows when he expresses a wish to become an 'actor' and Ralph's view on the convicts

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work